Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 11th European Nutrition and Dietetics Conference Melia Avenida America, Madrid, Spain.

Day 3 :

  • Track 14: Food Science & Chemistry Track 15: Public Health Research Track 16: Diet & Appetite Track 17: Vitaminology & Lipidology Track 18: Nutritional Neuroscience & Eating Disorders Track 19: Renal Nutrition & Metabolism Track 20: Renal Nutrition & Metabolism Track 21: Holistic & Integrative Nutrition Track 22: Food & Nutritional Immunology Track 23: Food & Nutritional Toxicology Track 24: Food & Nutritional Metabolomics Track 25: Protein Science Track 26: Behavioral Nutrition & Physical Activity
Speaker
Biography:

Professor Kaj Winther was earlier deeply involved in cardiovascular research and medicine with special reference to thrombosis and haemostasis and worked for a period at the Harvard Medical School, Boston, on the topic “Circadian variation in Myocardial Infraction”. Later in his career he more and more focused on development and clinical testing of herbal remedies and different versions of new foods. His interest in food and herbal remedies is also based on the fact that much prescription medicine including the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID`s) are blamed for serious side effects. As many of our top athletes and more and more of the average population trying to get into a “better shape” is abusing NSAID`s, more attention should be drawn to develop new “pain-killers” without serious side effects. Here some food supplements, herbal remedies and some new foods, might be interesting to future develop – replies Kaj Winther.

Abstract:

Statement of the problem: Strenuous exercise results in muscle pain and stiffness. This can reduce training capacity, success during competition and quality of life, especially if optimal daily performance is mandatory as in bicycling (Tour de France) or in team sports (hockey and soccer) where tournaments can go for days.  Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID`s) reduces muscle symptoms. However, gastro intestinal “side effects” occur. This research aims to clarify if powdered rose hip, subspecies LiTo, containing galactolipid GOPO and seeds  alleviates muscle pain and stiffness observed after  exercise. Methodology and Theoretical Orientation: Randomized, placebo controlled studies were conducted in 76 horses (trotters) and in 44 greyhounds treated 0.1 – 0.3 g powder/kg body weigh daily, for three month. The staff around  the animals evaluated muscle pain and stiffness on  questionnaires and animal competition speed. Healthy, human, middle age, modestly trained volunteers in randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled design and 18 younger trained volunteers (cross-fit), in open trial, were given the same treatment, in lower dose, for at least 3 month. Findings: In horses and greyhounds  rose-hip treatment reduced muscle pain and stiffness when evaluated vs placebo the day after competition (p<0.048). Active treatment improved the speed of animals to some extent. In modestly trained human volunteers active treatment resulted in a significant decline in reported muscle stiffness and pain (p<0.045) and in an increase in the quality of life (p<0.040). The younger group of intensively trained cross-fitters reported a significant decline in pain and stiffness the day after strenuous exercise (p<0.020) and in an improvement of quality of life (p<0.035). Conclusion and Significance: The data suggest that the present rose hip food supplement alleviate pain and stiffness caused by exercise in animals and humans. The present remedy might reduce NSAID abuse in sportsmen and in ordinary people who want to improve their physical performance.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Houtkooper’s expertise focuses on the relationships of nutrition and physical activity to bone health, obesity prevention and personal fitness. She was selected to be a member of the Science Board for the President’s Council on Fitness, Sports and Nutrition, and is on the editorial board of the American College of Sports Medicine Health and Fitness Journal.  Her research has been funded by competitive grants from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), foundations and organizations. She has published over 50 peer reviewed research articles and is a co-author of numerous books, curriculums, magazine articles and other publications.

Abstract:

Osteoporosis is a metabolic bone disease characterized by excessively low bone density, bone fragility, and increased risk of fracture with relatively minor trauma. This debilitating disease cannot be cured but can be prevented. The etiology of osteoporosis is complex and multi-factorial. Evidence indicates the incidence of osteoporosis may be increasing even more than would be expected based on the increased number of older persons, suggesting a decrease in bone quality from generation to generation. If not prevented, osteoporosis can progress silently and painlessly until a bone fractures. The already staggering medical, social and economic costs related to osteoporosis can be expected to increase unless effective prophylactic and therapeutic regimens are developed. The combination of adequate nutrient intake from food and supplements, exercise and medications may have added benefits for improving bone mineral density and preventing osteoporosis compared to a single intervention. This presentation will focus on key nutritional and exercise factors for the prevention of osteoporosis.  It will feature the exercise intervention and findings from the Bone Estrogen Strength Training research study (B.E.S.T) which was a United States National Institutes of Health funded clinical trial. This study demonstrated that bone mineral density could be maintained or increased in the short term (1 year) and the long term (4 years) in postmenopausal women with a progressive resistance and weight-bearing exercise program and adequate nutritional intake. This research study indicated that individuals who consistently did the prescribed volume of weight lifted had the greatest effect on increasing bone mineral density. Health-care professionals may implement the B.E.S.T Exercise program by using the step-by-step educational book entitled The BEST Exercise Program for Osteoporosis Prevention.

Speaker
Biography:

Teruyoshi Amagai has completed his MD and PhD from University of Tsukuba, Japan and Clinical Practice from the Birmingham Children’s Hospital in UK during 1993 and 1994. He is the Professor of Mukogawa Women’s University since 2007 and has been In-charge of drawing up member, “Dietary Reference Intakes for Japanese (2015), developed by the Ministry of Health Labor and Welfare, Japanese Government. He is the Editorial Member, Nutrition in Clinical Practice, academic journal of American Society for Parent and Enteral Nutrition (ASPEN).

Abstract:

Background: A number of patients and at risk with non-communicable diseases (NCDs) must be growing year by year. However, as media-mediated information is mixing evidence and non-evidence and it is not easy to identify which is true and vice versa, nutritional education methodology must be essential to cease the growth of number of patients with NCDs.

Aim: To examine an effectiveness of a novel methodology to educate patients with NCDs, such as diabetes (DM), hypertension (HT), dyslipidemia (DL), and chronic kidney disease (CKD), on outcome.

Methods: A novel methodology was developed to educate patients with NCDs using dietary behavior questionnaire (brief self-administered diet history questionnaire: BDHQ) among group-basis. Based on results of individual BDHQ, their reading and aim to resolve their individual problems were discussed among group-basis. Outcome indicators of this education were the clinical objective parameters measured at the first outpatient clinic visited within three months after education, including HbA1c (%), mean blood pressure (mmHg), T-cholesterol (mg/dl), and eGFR, for patients with DM, HT, DL, and CKD, respectively. Then, an effectiveness was evaluated by the changing rate of these parameters, defining【(pre-) – (post-) / (pre) parameter】X100 (%). An effectiveness was made when this rate was above zero among four NCDs. All consecutive patients who have got group education between Apr, 2016 and Mar, 2017 in a single institute, were enrolled.

Results: To be under analyzed and shown in presentation.

Conclusion: This novel diet and nutrition-related education methodology must be analyzed in their effectiveness by changing rate of individual parameters. To our knowledge, this is the first report to study an effectiveness of diet and nutrition-related education for patients with NCDs.  

 

Speaker
Biography:

N Arlappa has completed his MD in Community Medicine from NTR University of Medical Sciences, India. He has been working as Nutrition Scientist in the Division of Community Studies, National Institute of Nutrition (NIN), Indian Council of Medical Research, Hyderabad, India, since 1997. He has 18 years research of experience in the field of Public Health Nutrition and published more than 50 scientific papers in peer-reviewed national and international journals. He has also published 4 book chapters, completed more than 40 research studies and published more than 250 technical reports. He has attended and presented more than 25 scientific papers in national and international conferences/workshops. He is the Faculty Member for the Courses of MPH (NIE), MSc (Nutrition) and PG Certificate course in Applied Nutrition at NIN and currently working as a Deputy Director.

Abstract:

Introduction: Rapid nutrition transition is taking place in worldwide, especially in developing and underdeveloped countries. As a part of it, there was an increased demand for domestic production and import of oilseeds and vegetable oils from other counties. Consequently, there is a marked increase in consumption of edible oils in Indian populations; from 31.4 g/d/capita in 1993–1994 to 41.6 g/d/capita in 2011–2012. In India, vegetable oils used in cooking represent 80% of the visible fat and there has been a shift from traditional groundnut oil to other oils such as palmolein, mustard, sunflower oils and increased consumption of ghee. Objective: The objective of this communication was to study the time trends in consumption pattern of Fats and Oils among Indian population. Materials & Methods: National Nutrition Monitoring Bureau (NNMB) has been carrying out large scale community based cross-sectional studies in rural, tribal and urban areas of different States of India, covering two-thirds of its geographical area. The latest surveys carried out by the NNMB and other organisations on diet and nutritional status of rural, tribal and urban population was utilised for this communication. Use of different cooking oils and consumption patterns of visible and total fats obtained through 24-hour re-call diet survey among the rural and tribal populations by age group, literacy status and occupation was analysed and presented. Results: Majority of households in India were using mustard oil for cooking purpose followed by groundnut, palm oil, soybean oil, coconut and sunflower oil.  In general, at household level, the intakes of visible fats are less than RDI (20gr), and the deficit intake of total fat was >50% of RDA during three time points among tribal and rural population. Similarly, the intake of total fat was grossly deficit against the RDA (40mg) across all the age groups and genders. Likewise, the mean household intakes of visible fats were below the RDI among urban populations. However, the adequacy (≥70% of RDA) of consumption of fats was higher among the adults (≥18 years) as compared to adolescents and children.Conclusions: In general, the dietary consumption of visible fats as well as total fats was grossly deficit among tribal, rural and urban population in India.

Speaker
Biography:

Eri Miyamoto has expertise in clinical nutrition. While working at an educational institution, she has learned and guided knowledge of various fields concerning nutrition. Currently I am studying outcome after esophageal cancer surgery.

Abstract:

Background: Esophageal cancer surgery has many postoperative complications even in surgical gastroenterological surgery, and length of hospital stay and mortality rate are also high, mainly due to surgical stress and impairment of water excretion. However, few clear indicator for moisture balance after esophageal cancer surgery exists so far.

Aim: To investigate an effect of cumulative water balance on outcomes.

Methods: All consecutive patients admitted for radical surgery for esophageal cancer (SE) to a single institute between January 2013 to December 2013 was enrolled. Exclusion criteria: liver and/or renal dysfunction. The cumulative water balance (WB) within 7 days after SE was calculated and subjects were divided according to the following method to examine outcome prediction factors:(1) WB >= vs. <5,000 ml, (2) WB >= vs. <2,500 ml, (3) average daily WB >= vs. <10ml /kg, (4) average daily WB >= vs. <5 ml /kg.

Results: (1) The group with water intake of >=10 ml /kg / day showed significantly longer antibiotic-free-days than that in another group (9 (5, 9) vs.9 (9, 9), p = 0.022). (2) The group with water intake of >=5 ml /kg/day showed significantly shorter Length of stay in ICU (days) than that in another group (5 (3.5, 6.5) vs. 7 (4.5, 7.5), p = 0.047)

Conclusion: An average water balance during 7 days after esophageal cancer surgery may be a predictor of outcome.

Speaker
Biography:

I have expertise of clinical nutrition. I am doing nutrition management and nutritional guidance at general hospital based on Japanese nutritionist license. On the other hand, I am conducting research on clinical nutrition in graduate school. This study investigated how nutrient intake before and after the onset of pressure ul participates in prevention and cure of pressure ulcer.

Abstract:

Background: Pressure ulcer (PU) is a financial and physio-psychological burden in hospital settings, especially in the super-aged society.

Aim: To examine an association between energy deficit in the 7 days before PU development and the severity of hospital-acquired PU developed after admission in older adult patients.

Methods: The study was conducted under a retrospective observational design in all consecutive patients admitted to a single general hospital between July 2014 and June 2016. Data collection: 1) demographics domain- sex, age, body weight, body mass index (BMI), Charlson comorbidity index (CCI), 2) PU domain- severity of PU scored by DESIGN-R score, NPUAP score, 3) blood test domain- hemoglobin (Hb), total lymphocyte count (TLC), serum albumin (Alb), C-reactive protein (CRP), Prognostic Nutritional Index (PNI), 4) nutrition domain- cumulative and daily energy and protein intakes 7 days before and 7 or 14 days after PU development, 5) outcome domain- survival status, length of hospital stay in hospital, length of days between admission and PU development. Then the follows were compared: Method 1-blood test data on admission and at development of pressure ulcers; Method 2-all data for subjects between energy sufficient and deficit groups: Method 3- energy intake between mild (NPUAP stage I,II) and severe (stage III, IV).

Results: Method 1: Serum Hb level (p <0.001), serum Alb level (p <0.001), and PNI (p <0.001) at PU development were significantly lower than that on admission. Method 2: no parameters showed a significant difference in energy sufficient and deficit group. Method 3: no significant differences in energy intake during 7 days before PU development and time-related clinical outcomes between mild and severe PU. (Table)

Conclusion: The results of the present study suggests that nutrition support for energy sufficiency during the 7 days before PU development had no impact on the PU severity and time-related outcomes.

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

Pregnancy, this particular moment in the life of a woman, requires monitoring of eating behavior changes. However the food choices during pregnancy should be varied and healthy, including the consumption of different food groups. Nutritional status is the process of acquisition and consumption of food, therefore a varied diet is associated with good nutritional status. This is why the nutrition education is a strategy commonly applied to improve maternal nutrition during pregnancy. Thus, it is crucial to assess "The eating behavior and nutritional status of pregnant women living in Keserwan Lebanon”. In order to evaluate the association of different persona, socioeconomic and sociodemographic factors with the eating behavior and nutrition in the concerned study category, a cross sectional descriptive study was conducted on a sample of 150 pregnant women aging between 18 and 40 years randomly selected from the hospitals and clinics located in Keserwan area and equally distributed between different cities and villages of the area according to altitude. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the eating behavior of the concerned population and to compare it to the recommendation of the food guide pyramid, their level of food awareness and finally to analyze their blood tests in order to detect any nutrients deficiency that they may face during the course of their pregnancy. Sociodemographic, lifestyle, eating behaviour, health, eating patterns, awareness and food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) were collected through a validated questionnaire specifically adapted for the purpose of the study. Statistical analysis was carried out and multivariate models were used in order to evaluate the association between several independent variables and the eating behaviour and nutritional status of Lebanese pregnant women. The final analysis has shown that 48.7% of pregnant women were aged between 30 and 40 years old, 56% had a normal BMI between 18.5 and 24.9, thus age affects the eating behavior, so the older are the pregnant women, and the healthier is their eating behavior. In fact, 80.7% had acceptable food behavior which is based on an equilibrium between both quantity and quality of food, although the recommended foods are foods found in the food pyramid and available in the Lebanese diet. In addition, 68% had an acceptable level of awareness concerning the health importance of good eating habits, therefore, it is positively affecting their food choices. Moreover, 50 % have an acceptable nutritional status which is confirmed from their biological tests. Future governmental or national studies and programs could be settled aiming to increase the awareness about the good eating behaviors and nutritional status of Lebanese pregnant women.

Biography:

I have expertise in nutrition. I am doing nutrition management and nutritional guidance at acute brain surgery special hospital based on Japanese nutritionist's license. On the other hand, I am conducting research on clinical nutrition in educational institution (graduate school). This model was constructed after the experience of evaluation and management at the workplace brain surgery special hospital, and it is a study on the relation between the body function and energy intake in the acute period of stroke.

Abstract:

Background: On the relation between energy intake and outcome in acute phase after onset of Stroke, as risk indicators on adverse events are not fully studied2, it was examined whether the Functional Independence Measure (FIM) score on admission is a risk indicator for energy intake during the first 7 days of acute phase.

Methods: Patients with Stroke, admitted between January 2015 and March 2015, were enrolled. Data on characteristics and nutritional status of patients were collected from electronic medical record. The Subjects were divided according to FIM score on admission and energy intake for the first 7 days. The outcome index were as the followings: length of stay in SCU, presence of serum C-reactive protein (CRP) ≥6mg/dl. The logistic-regression analysis was conducted to examine the length of stay in SCU.

Results:192 patients were enrolled. (I) Comparing two groups divided by FIM scores on admission: (1) the energy intake in the first seven days was significantly lower in the group of ≺75 points (median: 75points, P ≺0.001). (2) length of stay in SCU ≥5 days was significantly longer (median: 5 days, P ≺0.001), and (3) more patients with CRP ≥6mg/dl during the first week

(median: 0.6mg/dl, P = 0.024). (II) Comparing two groups divided according to energy intake in the first seven days after admission by target energy intake ≺50% vs. ≥50% or ≺66% vs. ≥66%: In the group of ≺50% and ≺66%, (4) none of the patients had a FIM score of ≥75 points on admission, (5) length of stay in SCU ≥5 days was significantly longer, (6) presence of CRP ≥6 mg / dl after hospitalization was significantly larger. (III) In multivariate analysis on binary values of length of stay in SCU ≥5 days: (7) strongly related to item of energy intake in first seven days ≺66%, (8) length of stay in SCU ≥5 days group vs. ≺5 days group: odds ratio = 0.165, (0.032 - 0.845).

Conclusions: These results suggested that FIM score on admission could be a risk indicator of energy intake during Stroke attack. In addition, it was suggested that the risk factor of the length of stay in SCU seemed an energy intake (< 66%) during the first seven days after admission.

Speaker
Biography:

Keflie, Tibebeselassie, is a PhD candidate in human nutrition at Institute of Biological Chemistry and Nutrition, University of Hohenheim, Stuttgart, Germany. He studied infectious diseases at Addis Abeba University, Ethiopia. Presently, he is working in nutrition and infectious diseases.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: There has been extensive focus on the quantity of food produced and consumed, and much less attention given to the nutritional quality of foods and diets. The aims of this study were to assess and examine the interactions between dietary patterns, dietary adequacy, nutritional quality and nutritional status, and to highlight their implications in nutritional interventions.   Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: A community based cross-sectional study was carried out in North Shewa zone of Amhara Regional State, Ethiopia from December, 2014 to February, 2015. Multistage sampling techniques were employed to recruit study subjects. A total of 640 subjects involved in the study. Data were collected using structured and seven-day recall questionnaires developed from the guidelines for measuring household and individual dietary diversity. Chi-Square test, Kruskal-Walis test, spearman correlation, multiple linear and multinomial regression models were used for inferential analyses. Findings: The main dietary patterns included cereals, vegetables and legumes. About 40% of subjects consumed either plant or animal source of vitamin A and 13.75% consumed meat, organs or fish source of haem iron. The median (range) of food variety score (FVS) and diet diversity score (DDS) were 16 (8-25) and 3.43 (1.14-5.57), respectively. About 28.1% of subjects were malnourished. FVS correlated with DDS (r=0.502, p<0.0001), body mass index (BMI) (r=0.145, p<0.0001) and average meal frequency (r=-0.102, p=0.01). The correlation between DDS and BMI was 0.190 (p<0.0001). FVS was determined by family size and educational status, but the later determined DDS. Conclusion & Significance: Poor dietary adequacy and nutritional quality as well as high risks for micronutrient deficiencies were identified. These underlined the implications of nutritional interventions and therefore, it is recommended to improve food and nutrition security in the area.

Speaker
Biography:

Anna, Kiss (1989) BSc in dietetics; (University of Pécs; Faculty of Health Science); MSc in Nutritional sciences; (Semmelweis University, Budapest), clinical practice at Frankfurter Diakonie Kliniken, Ph.d. student (2nd year) at Faculty of Food Sciences of Szent István University, Department of Food Economics. Topics of Ph.d. thesis: Social burden of obesity. Part-time expert at National Food Chain Safety Office. Field of interest: diet in Obesity and Underweight, sport nutrition, clinical nutrition.

Abstract:

Background: the prevalence of obesity among the Hungarian adult population is one of the highest in Europe, being one of the main factors of mortality.

Motivation: A frequent counter-argument in framework of debates on modification of nutrition structure of population is the high cost of changing to more “healthier” nutritional patters. This is an extremely important problem in a middle-income country, where the food-related expenses are as high as 40% of disposable income of households. Our goal has been to determine the characteristic features of current nutrition structure, cost of it, and the cost of optimised nutrition structure.

Methodology: In framework of a preliminary study of a national-wide survey, face-to-face interviews have been carried out to determine the food consumption structure of 80 Hungarian households in two non-consecutive days, offering information on nutrition of nearly 200 respondents. The sample was distorted, because the dwellers of capital of Hungary, and the intelligentsia have been over-represented in it, but could furnish reliable information on consumption-structure of middle-, and middle-upper class of the society.

Dataset has been analysed by different sophisticated artificial intelligence methods (machine learning algorithms), with purpose of obtaining an optimal classification of most characteristic food consumption patterns.

On base of patterns, offering the best accuracy, as well as internationally accepted data-bases on recommended nutrition intake, taking into consideration the physical activity as well as demographic characteristics of the sample and the actual procuration prices of different products, applying the Linear Programming algorithm of Lindo® Systerms a recommended nutrition structure has been developed for each pattern.

Results: comparative analysis of actual and optimised nutrition intake values highlights the false argument of high cost of healthy nutrition. This fact opens new frontiers for the tailor-made mobile applications, offering a suitable help for consumers of healthy, easy, cost-effective and sustainable food choice.

Speaker
Biography:

Mona Almujaydil, I am currently pursuing PhD in Human Nutrition at Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester, United Kingdom.

Abstract:

Vitamin D deficiency has long been recognised as a cause of skeletal diseases such as osteomalacia and rickets. In recent years, concerns have also spread to a range of non-skeletal conditions (Holick et al., 2011). Hypovitaminosis D is a serious problem in the UK (Sinha et al., 2013). Reduced sunshine exposure and limited dietary sources of vitamin D, coupled with other factors could lead to increased incidence of hypovitaminosis D among the UK population especially amongst ethnic minorities due to their eating habits and high skin pigmentation. The purpose of this study is to determine which ethnic minority groups are living in Manchester (latitude, 53°N) who are at greater risk of developing vitamin D deficiency and needs more awareness and effective recommendations related to diet and lifestyle in order to attain the adequate level of vitamin D. In this study, a questionnaire was used to determine diet and lifestyle factors that are associated with an increase a risk of hypovitaminosis D. Two hundred fifty three respondents who completed the questionnaire. The estimated mean vitamin D intake by food frequency questionnaire was 2.26 µ/d for South Asian, followed by Arab (2.00 µ/d) while the lowest vitamin D intake was among Black people. The average of usual sun exposure was 0.25 hours/day for Arab, South Asian. Other risk factors for vitamin D deficiency included low use of supplements (p > 0.05); being overweight or obese (64 % Arab and 39% Black race); the percentage of smoker and alcohol intake were higher among Black participants than other (13.3% Arab ,45.5% Black race). This study shows that vitamin D intake (food and supplements) and time spend outdoors were low among all ethnic minority groups that may pose a threat to the development of vitamin D deficiency.

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

Background: We examined the safety of semisolid nutrition by tracking its flow using contrast X-rays.

Method: A bolus of semisolid nutrition containing contrast medium was administered to examine the residual quantity in the stomach over time. A gastrointestinal prokinetic drug was administered when the retention of the contrast medium in the stomach was observed. This study was performed from June 2011 through the end of June 2015.

Results: A gastrointestinal prokinetic drug was administered to 9 patients with the contrast medium remaining in the stomach. The results showed use of the drug to significantly reduce the contrast area in the stomach at 6 hours after administration.

Conclusions: Our results confirmed the necessity of tracking a semisolid nutrient bolus containing contrast medium, employing contrast X-rays with a gastrointestinal prokinetic drug, to examine its useful