Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 4th International Conference and Exhibition on Nutrition Chicago, Illinois, USA.

Day 2 :

  • Track 3 Nutrition and Cancer & Innovative Treatments
    Track 4 Public Health Nutrition and Pediatric Nutrition
    Track 5 Animal Nutrition
Biography:

Patrick Kamphuis is Director Research Elderly Care and Disease at Nutricia Research Centre for Specialized Nutrition in Utrecht, The Netherlands. He is member of the Medical Nutrition R&D board. Patrick Kamphuis studied Animal Sciences at the Wageningen University in Wageningen. He specialised in Neurosciences and Physiology and graduated in 1997. In 2001 he obtained his PhD degree at the Rudolf Magnus Institute of Neurosciences, Department of Medical Pharmacology, University of Utrecht. He joined Danone Research as Scientist and became responsible for various research projects. His major interest is applying science in innovative nutritional concepts, in particular to develop new products for people with neurological and psychiatric disorders. From 2004 onwards he was responsible for the scientific as well as the clinical neuroscience projects, amongst others the Alzheimer’s project. In this position he has contributed to the development of specialized nutritional products for use in several disease areas. In 2008, Patrick Kamphuis was appointed Director Neurology Research at Danone Research. Since 2010 he is combining his responsibilities for the neuroscience team with the management of muscle & metabolism team focusing on disease targeted nutrition R&D programs in different disease areas such as sarcopenia, HIV, oncology and COPD.

Abstract:

Synaptic loss has been recognized as the strongest structural correlate with memory impairment in AD and is apparent already early in the disease process. Synapses largely consist of neuronal membranes which are mainly composed of phospholipids. Phospholipid synthesis depends on the availability of the rate limiting nutritional precursors and cofactors. Basic science studies indicate that their increased intake enhances synaptogenesis. Animal studies from various labs showed increased cognitive performance and improved neuro-imaging markers following dietary enrichment with these compounds. However, lower plasma levels of these nutrients are widely observed in AD, e.g. lower levels of uridine and docosahexaenoic acid is found in early AD patients compared with controls. Based on these insights, the specific nutrient combination Fortasyn®1Connect was designed to enhance synapse formation and function in AD. Fortasyn Connect is present in Souvenaid®1, a medical food intended for use in early AD. The efficacy and mode of action of Souvenaid is investigated in the clinical trial program, including: 1) 12-week proof-of-concept Souvenir I RCT in drugnaïve mild AD patients; 2) 24-week S-Connect RCT in mild-to-moderate AD patients using AD medication; 3) 24-week Souvenir II RCT2 in drug-naïve mild AD patients; 4) 24-week Souvenir II open-label-extension study; 5) 24-month LipiDiDiet RCT3 in prodromal AD; 6) Mode of action studies: a) electroencephalography (EEG) and magneto-encephalography outcomes in Souvenir II; b) biomarkers in LipiDiDiet (MRI atrophy rates and CSF measures); c) magnetic resonance spectroscopy; d) FDG-PET. The Souvenir I and II studies showed that Souvenaid improved the primary outcome memory performance. The Souvenir II OLE study showed continued improvement of the exploratory memory outcome throughout 48 weeks. The S-Connect study did not show an effect on cognition in mild to moderate AD patients using AD medication. All completed studies showed that Souvenaid is well-tolerated, with a high compliance (≥93%). EEG measures were included in Souvenir II to study neuronal activity and thus indirectly synaptic activity. Significant EEG differences suggest that Souvenaid preserves functional connectivity and brain network organization in mild AD, supporting the hypothesis of changed synaptic activity. These results suggest that Souvenaid is most efficacious in early AD and warrant long-term trials in the very early AD process, like the ongoing LipiDiDiet study. Main and recent findings will be presented.

Biography:

Ignatius A Onimawo is a Nutritionist holding a PhD in Human Nutrition. He has interest in public health nutrition in areas of anemia among school age children, obesity and weight control and policy issues. He has been Editor-in-Chief of Nigerian Journal of Nutritional Sciences and he has several publications in different aspects of nutritional sciences and he is also a Professor of Nutrition.

Abstract:

Objective: To access the energy expenditure and body composition of female agric students in Ambrose Alli University Ekpoma, Nigeria. Subjects & Methods: A total of seventy-five (75) subjects aged, 19-30 were randomly selected for this study and they are all females of Ambrose Alli University, Ekpoma Edo State. They all volunteered by filling the consent forms. Body composition was determined using anthropometric methods. Body weight, height, waist and arm circumferences were measured using standard methods. Body Mass Indices (BMI) of the subjects was calculated from weight and height measurements. Skinfold thickness was measured at biceps, triceps, subscapular, suprailiac and abdomen using skinfold caliper. The energy expenditure was assessed based on three days energy expenditure diary using factorial method. Results: The results showed that the mean energy expenditure for the female students was 2315.0 ± 419.25 kcal. The mean height values were 163.45 ± 4.82 for the female and weight value were 55.60 ± 7.70 for female. The other anthropometric parameters determined include lean body mass, total body water and total skinfold thickness and BMI. The high energy expenditure was attributed to high energy level spent in farm activities which were manual and labor intensive. Conclusion: The results showed that young female agriculture students spent considerable energy in their practical work on the farms. A great majority of the female students had normal BMI.

Biography:

Iyawe Hanson O T has completed his PhD from Ambrose Alli University, Ekpoma in Edo State Nigeria. He is a Senior Lecturer at the same University with over a decade of teaching and research experience. He is also the incumbent National General Secretary of the Nutrition Society of Nigeria. He has published more than 20 papers in learned journals and has served as an Editorial Board Member of the faculty journal.

Abstract:

The leaf of Ocimum gratissimum is acclaimed to have medicinal value with scarce information on the role it may play in controlling oxidative stress. The interest on the leaf derives from the need to have an insight as to the possible effect it may have on oxidative stress. The objective of the study was to examine the effect of graded extracts of Ocimum gratissimum leaves on some oxidative stress indicators. The leave samples were collected and air dried, homogenized and sieved to obtain particle sizes of ≤0.250mm. Aqueous and methanolic extracts of samples were obtained and used to assay for total alkaloid and phenolic contents, free radical scavenging activity, reducing power and the extent of lipid peroxidation in liver and kidneys were determined. Standard methods were used in all assays. Phenolic contents in Ocimum gratissimum were detected as 1.59 ± 0.13 and 0.15 ± 007 (mg GAE/g) in aqueous and methanol respectively. Alkaloid levels were 0.24 ± 0.02 and 0.96 ± 0.04 (μg/g) in aqueous and methanol respectively. Reducing power of the leaves increased progressively with increasing extract concentrations (mg/mL) in both water and methanol in comparison with respective BHT (2.49) and ascorbic acid (2.16) controls. Ability to scavenge free radicals increased with increasing extract concentrations with highest percentages in aqueous extracts(95.90%) compared to control (100%). Leave extracts were observed to significantly (p<0.05) increased lipid peroxidations in liver and kidneys of experimental models. The leaf of Ocimum gratissimum is thus assessed to be valuable in free radical quenching.

Biography:

Abstract:

Introduction: Worms grubs and insects’ larvae are traditionally important foods and tasty treats for many cultures and individuals around the world. They are gaining popularity for their high protein and low-fat values. Their potential is seriously being considered in food security and poverty alleviation strategies in many communities around the world. The nutritional and economic potentials of these abundant creatures are yet to be fully realized and tapped especially in the face of climate change. Varies coleoptera is one of the grub worms found in animal dung. The study was aimed at evaluating the nutrient composition of V. coleoptera and to unveil its potential as a strategy to mitigate food insecurity. Methods: Live grub worms were hand-picked from animal dung dumps in the months of April-June. They were washed, gut squeezed out, boiled in saltwater for three minutes, set out to dry and rusted in an oven at 50oC for ten minutes. The processed sample was analyzed for its proximate nutrient content and mineral element profile using standard procedures. Results & Discussion: Proximate composition showed that processed ready-to-eat V. coleoptera contains 49.16% crude protein, 26.34% crude fat, 18.2% Nitrogen Free Extract (NFE), 5.0% crude fibre, 5.48% ash and caloric value of 4096 cal/g. Mineral elements range between 0.06%-22.9%. These included sodium, sulfur, iron, zinc, calcium, phosphorus, magnesium and copper. Amino acid profile showed that nineteen of the commonly occurring amino acids except tryptophan were present. The nutrient composition of V. coleoptera is comparable to those of conventional animal source foods such as beef and fish. Conclusion: It is concluded that processing and consumption of grub worms could add to nutrient intake and variety to staple foods of indigenous communities. When properly harnessed and large scale production and commercialization are explored, it can be a good source of livelihood for families especially in poor resource settings.

Biography:

Hlekani Vanessa Mbhatsani is a Lecturer of Nutrition at the University of Venda and a registered Nutritionist with the Health Professional Council of South Africa. She has received both her undergraduate BSc and MSc in Public Nutrition at the University of Venda. As a Post-graduate student she was given an opportunity to perform Research and Teaching Assistant functions. This provoked the teaching and research interest that led her to applying for the lecturing position after completion of her MSc. To enhance her teaching responsibilities, she persuaded a Post graduate Diploma in Higher Education at Rhodes University. She is currently studying towards her PhD with Stellenbosch University. Her research areas of interest include micronutrients, role of indigenous foods in health and nutrition, child nutrition and food security. She is a co-author of chapter six in a book titled “Community Nutrition for South Africa; A Right Based Approach”. She has presented her work both in national and international conferences and only published a few articles in peer reviewed journals

Abstract:

Background: Children under five years constitute the most vulnerable group and their nutritional status is a sensitive indicator of community health and nutrition. Diet of many South Africans consists of porridge as staple food which is usually consumed with vegetables, legumes and a small amount of animal derived food. These animal derived food sources are not consumed extensively due to their high cost, limited supply and religious or cultural practices. Objective: To determine the prevalence of iron deficiency among preschool children aged 3-5 years in Vhembe district, Limpopo province, South Africa. Methods: This study was carried out on 400 preschool children in Vhembe district, Limpopo province, South Africa. Municipalities were purposively selected and subjects were chosen by simple random sampling methods. Anthropometric measurements were made following standard techniques. Serum zinc, iron, ferritin, T saturation, transferrin and CRP levels were measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometery. Results: Only 349 children out of the total population were included in this study. The prevalence of wasting, stunting and underweight was 1.4%, 18.6% and 0.3% respectively while 20.9% of the children were overweight and 9.7% were obese. The prevalence of zinc deficiency was 42.6% and anemia was 28% both were significantly higher in females as compared to males. When using both serum ferritin and T saturation levels as markers of iron deficiency 7 (2%) children were found to have IDA. Combined iron and zinc deficiencies using ferritin as a marker of iron deficiency was found in 8 (2.3%) of the children while when using T saturation as a marker of iron 42 (12%) of the children had combined iron and zinc deficiencies. Conclusion: Zinc deficiency and anemia are common in preschool children of Vhembe district, Limpopo province. Iron and zinc deficiency in children is associated with poor growth development, alteration in neurological function, immunological response and behavior changes.

Biography:

Daniel S Peiffer is a researcher working at medical college of Wisconsin. His main research interests are nutrition and cancer research

Abstract:

Freeze-dried black raspberries (BRB), their component anthocyanins (ACs), and a metabolite of BRB ACs, protocatechuic acid (PCA), inhibit the development of esophagus cancer in rats induced by the carcinogen, N-nitrosomethyl benzyl amine (NMBA). All three components reduce inflammation in the esophagus and in plasma. The present study determined the relation of changes in inflammatory markers to infiltration of innate immune cells into NMBA-treated esophagus. Rats were injected with NMBA (0.35 mg/kg) for five weeks while on control diet. Following NMBA treatment, rats were fed diets containing 6.1% BRB powder, an AC-rich fraction of BRBs (3.8 µmoles/g diet), or 500 ppm PCA. At weeks 15, 25 and 35, inflammatory biomarker expression in the plasma and esophagus was quantified and infiltration of immune cells in the esophagus was examined. At all three time points, BRB, AC, and PCA similarly affected cytokine production in the esophagus and plasma of NMBA-treated rats, relative to the NMBA-only control. These included decreased expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL1β, and increased the expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL10. Moreover, all three diets also increased the expression of IL12, a cytokine that activates both cytolytic NK and CD8+ T cells. Additionally, the three diets also decreased infiltration of both macrophages and neutrophils into the esophagus. Overall, our results suggest that another mechanism by which BRBs, ACs, and PCA inhibit NMBA-induced esophageal tumorigenesis is by altering cytokine expression and innate immune cell–trafficking into tumor tissues.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr El Habachi is a Professor in the Department of Physiology and the Academic Director of the Alexandria Clinical Research Centre in the Faculty of Medicine, Alexandria University, Egypt. She is a multilingual Professor with a track record of establishing multinational partnerships, and teaches in both English and French. She has been pivotal in establishing the University Clinical Research Centre. Part of her pre-doctoral training was conducted in the Heart Science Centre, Imperial College, UK. In May 2006 she studied clinical research and GCP, University of Maryland USA. She has a broad research experience in national and international projects.

Abstract:

As oophorectomised groxidative stress is proposed to be responsible for many of the menopause associated disorders, antioxidants may play an important role in this situation. In this study, forty albino female rats were divided into 4 groups: normal control group, oophorectomised group, oophorectomised group treated with 17- estradiol and oup treated with antioxidants(Vitamin C and low dose Vitamin A).The following were measured: total antioxidant (TAO) and malondialdehyde (MDA), lipid profile, serum insulin, glucose and homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), bone specific alkaline phosphatase (BALP), urinary hydroxyproline, weight gain and visceral fat. A positive correlation was found between MDA and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL), HOMA-IR and BALP and urinary hydroxyproline level . Those results denoted that oxidative stress might be a cause of dyslipidemia, insulin resistance and osteoporosis associated with menopause. Both E2 and vitamins in oophorectomised rats led to a significant decrease in MDA , weight gain, visceral fat , cholesterol , LDL cholesterol , and significant increase in HDL and TAO levels compared to oophorectomised rats. Also, both treatments led to a significant decrease of HOMA-IR, BALP and urinary hydroxylproline .An interesting finding was detected where oophorectomised rats showed a decrease in triglyceride level which was significantly increased by E2 administration whereas antioxidant administration produced no change . Our results denote the beneficial effects of antioxidant administration in surgically induced menopause in rats regarding oxidative stress, weight gain, atherogenic lipid profile , insulin sensitivity and bone turnover similar to that of E2.

Break: Networking & Refreshments 10:50-11:10 @ Foyer
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Charlene Schmidt, PhD, RDN has been practicing in the clinical field of geriatric nutrition for 25 years and teaching in higher education for the past 14 years at the University of WI-Stevens Point and Stout. She is currently a faculty member of University of Tennessee Chattanooga. Diedri White has been a registered dietitian/nutritionist (RDN) for 34 years with clinical practice experience. She holds MS in both Clinical Nutrition and Nutrition Education. Dissertation defense is scheduled, May 2015, for DrPH (Health Education) from Loma Linda University. She is the Dietetics Program Director at University of Tennessee Chattanooga.

Abstract:

Dietetic students enrolled in Medical Nutrition Therapy courses during the senior year of the didactic program from Spring 2013 through Spring 2015 participated in various interprofessional activities along with undergraduate students from varied healthcare professions. A Health Resources and Service Administration Grant provided opportunities for students to increase understanding and direct experience in interprofessional collaboration. Activities included 1) completion of a video-based learning module, 2) participation in older/geriatric-focused health fairs conducted at several housing facilities, 3) observation of “one on one” counseling with client’s in their homes and in local clinics, and 4) completion of reflections about their interprofessional experiences. At the community health fairs, 36 dietetic students also worked collaboratively with graduate students from various health related disciplines. Dietetic students observed registered dietitian/nutritionists (RDN’s) providing nutrition information to residents with multiple chronic conditions such as heart failure, diabetes mellitus, osteoporosis, hyperlipidemia and hypertension. Topics of discussion and nutrition education materials focused on the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension diet, fluid intake for congestive heart failure, food label reading, low sodium lifestyles/diets and bone mineral health. At the health fairs, dietetic students assisted RDN’s in presenting nutrition information to the participants by using food models, handouts, sample food labels and measuring bone mineral density with the Sahara™ Bone Sonometer. Dietetic students visited homes and clinic sites to observe the RDN performing nutrition counseling with clients. Qualitative results of the student’s’ reflections about experiences in these interprofessional activities and working collaboratively with students from other health care disciplines will be presented.

Speaker
Biography:

Patrick Kamphuis is Director Research Elderly Care and Disease at Nutricia Research – Centre for Specialized Nutrition in Utrecht, The Netherlands. He is member of the Medical Nutrition R&D board. Patrick Kamphuis studied Animal Sciences at the Wageningen University in Wageningen. He specialised in Neurosciences and Physiology and graduated in 1997. In 2001 he obtained his PhD degree at the Rudolf Magnus Institute of Neurosciences, Department of Medical Pharmacology, University of Utrecht. He joined Danone Research as Scientist and became responsible for various research projects. His major interest is applying science in innovative nutritional concepts, in particular to develop new products for people with neurological and psychiatric disorders. From 2004 onwards he was responsible for the scientific as well as the clinical neuroscience projects, amongst others the Alzheimer’s project. In this position he has contributed to the development of specialized nutritional products for use in several disease areas.

Abstract:

Synaptic loss has been recognized as the strongest structural correlate with memory impairment in AD and is apparent already early in the disease process. Synapses largely consist of neuronal membranes which are mainly composed of phospholipids. Phospholipid synthesis depends on the availability of the rate limiting nutritional precursors and cofactors. Basic science studies indicate that their increased intake enhances synaptogenesis. Animal studies from various labs showed increased cognitive performance and improved neuroimaging markers following dietary enrichment with these compounds.However, lower plasma levels of these nutrients are widely observed in AD, e.g. lower levels of uridine and docosahexaenoic acid are found in early AD patients compared with controls. Based on these insights, the specific nutrient combination Fortasyn®1 Connect was designed to enhance synapse formation and function in AD. Fortasyn Connect is present in Souvenaid®1, a medical food intended for use in early AD. The efficacy and mode of action of Souvenaid is investigated in the clinical trial program, including: 1) 12-week proof-of-concept Souvenir I RCT in drug-naïve mild AD patients; 2) 24-week S-Connect RCT in mild-to-moderate AD patients using AD medication; 3) 24-week Souvenir II RCT2 in drug-naïve mild AD patients; 4) 24-week Souvenir II open-label-extension study; 5) 24-month LipiDiDiet RCT3 in prodromal AD; 6) Mode of action studies: a) electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography outcomes in Souvenir II; b) biomarkers in LipiDiDiet (MRI atrophy rates and CSF measures); c) magnetic resonance spectroscopy; d) FDG-PET. The Souvenir I and II studies showed that Souvenaid improved the primary outcome memory performance. The Souvenir II OLE study showed continued improvement of the exploratory memory outcome throughout 48 weeks. The S-Connect study did not show an effect on cognition in mild to moderate AD patients using AD medication. All completed studies showed that Souvenaid is well-tolerated, with a high compliance (≥93%). EEG measures were included in Souvenir II to study neuronal activity and thus indirectly synaptic activity. Significant EEG differences suggest that Souvenaid preserves functional connectivity and brain network organization in mild AD, supporting the hypothesis of changed synaptic activity. These results suggest that Souvenaid is most efficacious in early AD and warrant long-term trials in the very early AD process, like the ongoing LipiDiDiet study. Main and recent findings will be presented.

Speaker
Biography:

I am Professor Ignatius Onimawo. I obtained my PhD in Human Nutrition from University of Ibadan. I am a consultant on Public health nutrition. Formerly Dean of College of Food Processing and Storage Technology and Foundation Head of Department of Human Nutrition and Dietetics of Michael Okpara University of Agriculture, Umudike. Formerly the Editor-in-Chief of the Nigerian Journal of Nutritional Sciences and formerly the Director of Academic Planning and Head of Biochemistry, Ambrose Alli University Ekpoma, Nigeria. Currently I have more than 100 papers published in reputed national and international journals. I am the current the Secretary General of the Federation of African Nutrition Societies. I have authored two and co-authored four books. I am also a Consultant/Resource Person to GAIN (Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition), UNICEF, FAO, Federal Ministry of Health, Federal Ministry of Education and EU/ETI (European Union/ETI Consult-France) on nutrition matters in Nigeria.

Abstract:

OBJECTIVE: To access the energy expenditure and body composition of female agric students in Ambrose Alli University Ekpoma, Edo State, Nigeria. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A total of seventy-five (75) subjects aged, 19-30 were randomly selected for this study, they are all females of Ambrose Alli University, Ekpoma Edo State. They all volunteered by filling the consent forms. Body composition was determined using anthropometric methods. Body weight, height, waist and arm circumferences were measured using standard methods. Body mass indices (BMI) of the subjects were calculated from weight and height measurements. Skinfold thickness was measured at biceps, triceps, subscapular, suprailiac and abdomen using skinfold calipers. The energy expenditure was assessed based on three (3) days energy expenditure diary using factorial method. RESULTS: The results showed that the mean energy expenditure for the female students was 2315.0 ± 419.25 kcal. The mean height values were 163.45 ± 4.82 for the female and weight value were 55.60 ± 7.70 for female The other anthropometric parameters determined include lean body mass, total body water and total skinfold thickness and BMI. The high energy expenditure was attributed to high energy level spent in farm activities which were manual and labour intensive CONCLUSION: The results showed that young female Agriculture students spent considerable energy in their practical work on the farms. A great majority of the female students had normal BMI.

Speaker
Biography:

Mahopo Tjale Cloupas completed his Master of public nutrition from the University of Venda and currently studying for his Post graduate diploma in Health Education with the University of Cape Town. He is a lecturer at the University of Venda, Department of Nutrition. He has published three papers and a co-investigator in the Malnutrition and enteric diseases study, a multi country study. He is a registered Nutritionist with the Health Professions council of South Africa.

Abstract:

Inappropriate feeding practices damage the gut mucosa of the small intestine in infants. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of feeding practices on gut function in infants at Dzimauli. A prospective birth cohort study was done in Dzimauli community in Limpopo Province, South Africa. Recruited children were 133. Data on feeding practices was collected twice weekly using the 24 hour recall. Infant mothers were informants. Lactulose: mannitol (L:M) data was collected at 3, 6 and 9 months. Almost all mothers (92.5%) breastfed their infants. However, there were no children who were exclusively breastfed for six months. On average, exclusive breastfeeding occurred for only 21 days. Mother’s age had negative correlation on the introduction of weaning food. Water and infant formula were the first “early foods” introduced. Solids and tea were also indicated as weaning foods. There were no children who had optimal feeding. Gut function results indicated poor intestinal permeability affecting 67.6 %, 55.3% and 43.5% of infants at 3, 6 and 9 months respectively. Gut function was conversely proportionate with age of infants. No significant relationship was observed between duration of exclusive breastfeeding and gut function. Type of “early food” introduced at 3 month determined the intestinal permeability and could do so for subsequent months. Poor trends of infant feeding still prevail in Limpopo Province, South Africa. Type of food and the age at which food was introduced impacted on gut function. Further investigation on mother’s non-compliance with recommended feeding practices calls for attention.

Break: Lunch Break 12:50-13:50 @ Athens
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Iyawe Hanson has completed his PhD at the age of 42 years from Ambrose Alli University, Ekpoma in Edo State Nigeria. He is a Senior Lecturer at the same University, with over a decade of teaching and research experience. He is also the incumbent National General Secretary of the Nutrition Society of Nigeria. He has published more than 20 papers in learned journals and has served as an editorial board member of the faculty journal. He is happily married with children.

Abstract:

The leaf of Ocimum gratissimum is acclaimed to have medicinal value, with scarce information on the role it may play in controlling oxidative stress. The interest on the leaf derives from the need to have an insight as to the possible effect it may have on oxidative stress. The objective of the study was to examine the effect of graded extracts of Ocimum gratissimum leaves on some oxidative stress indicators. The leave samples were collected and air dried, homogenized and sieved to obtain particle sizes of ≤ 0.250mm. Aqueous and methanolic extracts of samples were obtained and used to assay for total alkaloid and phenolic contents, free radical scavenging activity, reducing power and the extent of lipid peroxidation in liver and kidneys were determined. Standard methods were used in all assays. Phenolic contents in Ocimum gratissimum were detected as 1.59 ± 0.13 and 0.15 ± 007 (mgGAE/g) in aqueous and methanol respectively. Alkaloid levels were 0.24 ± 0.02 and 0.96 ± 0.04 (µg/g) in aqueous and methanol respectively. Reducing power of the leaves increased progressively with increasing extract concentrations (mg/mL) in both water and methanol in comparison with respective BHT (2.49) and ascorbic acid (2.16) controls. Ability to scavenge free radicals increased with increasing extract concentrations with highest percentages in aqueous extracts (95.90%) compared to control (100%). Leave extracts were observed to significantly (p<0.05) increased lipid peroxidations in liver and kidneys of experimental models. The leaf of ocimum gratissimum is thus assessed to be valuable in free radical quenching.

Biography:

Abstract:

Introduction: Worms grubs and insects’ larvae are traditionally important foods and tasty treats for many cultures and individuals around the world. They are gaining popularity for their high protein and low-fat values. Their potential is seriously being considered in food security and poverty alleviation strategies in many communities around the world. The nutritional and economic potentials of these abundant creatures are yet to be fully realized and tapped especially in the face of climate change. Varies coleoptera is one of the grub worms found in animal dung. The study was aimed at evaluating the nutrient composition of V. coleoptera and to unveil its potential as a strategy to mitigate food insecurity. Methods: Live grub worms were hand-picked from animal dung dumps in the months of April-June. They were washed, gut squeezed out, boiled in saltwater for three minutes, set out to dry and rusted in an oven at 50o C for ten minutes. The processed sample was analyzed for its proximate nutrient content and mineral element profile using standard procedures. Results & Discussion: Proximate composition showed that processed ready-to-eat V. coleoptera contains 49.16% crude protein, 26.34% crude fat, 18.2% Nitrogen Free Extract (NFE), 5.0% crude fibre, 5.48% ash and caloric value of 4096 cal/g. Mineral elements range between 0.06%-22.9%. These included sodium, sulfur, iron, zinc, calcium, phosphorus, magnesium and copper. Amino acid profile showed that nineteen of the commonly occurring amino acids except tryptophan were present. The nutrient composition of V. coleoptera is comparable to those of conventional animal source foods such as beef and fish. Conclusion: It is concluded that processing and consumption of grub worms could add to nutrient intake and variety to staple foods of indigenous communities. When properly harnessed and large scale production and commercialization are explored, it can be a good source of livelihood for families especially in poor resource settings.

Speaker
Biography:

Ms Hlekani Vanessa Mbhatsani is a lecturer of Nutrition at the University of Venda and a registered nutritionist with the Health Professional Council of South Africa. She received both her undergraduate BSc and MSc in Public nutrition at the University of Venda. As a post-graduate student she was given an opportunity to perform research and teaching assistant functions. This provoked the teaching and research interest that led her to applying for the lecturing position after completion of her MSc. To enhance her teaching responsibilities, she persuaded a Post Graduate Diploma in Higher Education at Rhodes University. She is currently studying towards her PhD with Stellenbosch University. Ms. Mbhatsani’s research areas of interest include micronutrients, role of indigenous foods in health and nutrition,child nutrition and food security. She is a co-author of chapter six in a book titled’’ Community Nutrition for South Africa; A Right Based Approach”. She has presented her work both in national and international conferences and only published a few articles in peer reviewed journals. She currently resides in Limpopo Province with her family and can be contacted at [email protected] and or +27 72 74 6 6206.

Abstract:

Background: Children under five years constitute the most vulnerable group and their nutritional status is a sensitive indicator of community health and nutrition. Diet of many South Africans consists of porridge as staple food which is usually consumed with vegetables, legumes and a small amount of animal derived food. These animal derived food sources are not consumed extensively due to their high cost, limited supply and religious or cultural practices. Objective: To determine the prevalence of iron deficiency among preschool children aged 3-5 years in Vhembe district, Limpopo province, South Africa. Methods. This study was carried out on 400 preschool children in Vhembe district, Limpopo province, South Africa. Municipalities were purposively selected and subjects were chosen by simple random sampling methods. Anthropometric measurements were made following standard techniques. Serum zinc, iron, ferritin, T saturation, transferrin and CRP levels were measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometery. Results: Only 349 children out of the total population were included in this study. The prevalence of wasting, stunting and underweight was 1.4%, 18.6% and 0.3% respectively while 20.9% of the children were overweight and 9.7% were obese. The prevalence of zinc deficiency was 42.6% and anemia was 28%, both were significantly higher in females as compared to males. When using both serum ferritin and Tsaturation levels as markers of iron deficiency 7(2%) children were found to have IDA. Combined iron and zinc deficiencies using ferritin as a marker of iron deficiency was found in 8(2.3%) of the children while when using Tsaturation as a marker of iron 42(12%) of the children had combined iron and zinc deficiencies. Conclusion: Zinc deficiency and anemia are common in preschool children of Vhembe district, Limpopo province. Iron and zinc deficiency in children is associated with poor growth development, alteration in neurological function, immunological response and behaviour changes

Break: Networking & Refreshments 15:20-15:40 @ Foyer
Speaker
Biography:

Dr.Osama Ibrahim is a highly-experienced Principal Research Scientist with particular expertise in the field of microbiology, molecular biology, food safety, and bioprocessing for both pharmaceutical and food ingredients. He is knowledgeable in microbial screening /culture improvement; molecular biology and fermentation research for antibiotics, enzymes, therapeutic proteins, organic acids and food flavors; Biochemistry for metabolic pathways and enzymes kinetics, enzymes immobilization, bioconversion, and Analytical Biochemistry. Dr. Ibrahim was external research liaison for Kraft Foods with Universities for research projects related to molecular biology and microbial screening and holds three bioprocessing patents. In January 2005, he accepted an early retirement offer from Kraft Foods and in the same year he formed his own biotechnology company providing technical and marketing consultation for new startup biotechnology and food companies. Dr. Ibrahim received his B.S. in Biochemistry with honor and two M.S. degrees in Microbial physiology/ Fermentation and in Applied Microbiology. He received his Ph.D in Basic Medical Science (Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular biology) from New York Medical College. His research dissertation was on the construction of plasmid for the expression of a fusion protein of VEGF121/ Shiga-like toxin as a therapeutic protein for targeting angiogenesis (cancer treatment). Since 1979 he is a member of American Chemical Society, American Society of Microbiology, and Society of Industrial Microbiology.

Abstract:

High Intense-sweeteners (HIS) are commonly used as a sugar substitutes or sugar alternatives and provide sweet without calories. HIS are in high demands due to its multiple advantages including assisting people in losing weight or avoiding obesity and assisting diabetics to control their blood sugar level. The first known intense-sweetener is Saccharine that was discovered in the year 1878. Since then scientists discovered several other intensive sweeteners that are sweater than sucrose with zero calorie. Some discovered sweeteners are Plants extract (Stevoil glycosides, and Mogrosides), semi-synthetic peptides (Aspartame, and Neotame), and synthetic chemicals. (Saccharine, Sucralose, Acesulfame-K, and Cyclamate). These High intensive sweeteners have been approved as safe for applications [1] in foods, beverages, dietary supplements, and pharmaceuticals products by Food and Drug administration (FDA) [2] in United States and by other similar agencies in other countries [3]. The levels of these non-nutritive high intensive sweeteners used in foods, beverages, dietary supplements, and pharmaceutical products are based on the approved daily intake (ADI) by FDA and by other safety authorities worldwide. This ADI level is 100 fold lower than the safe dose demonstrated in laboratory studies. It is estimated that the global demand of HIS is exceeding 9.0 billion dollars and growing. The only HIS that is declining in global market is the old discovered sweetener Saccharine.

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

Introduction: Worms grubs and insects’ larvae are traditionally important foods and tasty treats for many cultures and individuals around the world. They are gaining popularity for their high protein and low-fat values. Their potential is seriously being considered in food security and poverty alleviation strategies in many communities around the world. The nutritional and economic potentials of these abundant creatures are yet to be fully realized and tapped especially in the face of climate change. Varies coleoptera is one of the grub worms found in animal dung. The study was aimed at evaluating the nutrient composition of V. coleoptera and to unveil its potential as a strategy to mitigate food insecurity. Methods: Live grub worms were hand-picked from animal dung dumps in the months of April-June. They were washed, gut squeezed out, boiled in saltwater for three minutes, set out to dry and rusted in an oven at 50o C for ten minutes. The processed sample was analyzed for its proximate nutrient content and mineral element profile using standard procedures. Results & Discussion: Proximate composition showed that processed ready-to-eat V. coleoptera contains 49.16% crude protein, 26.34% crude fat, 18.2% Nitrogen Free Extract (NFE), 5.0% crude fibre, 5.48% ash and caloric value of 4096 cal/g. Mineral elements range between 0.06%-22.9%. These included sodium, sulfur, iron, zinc, calcium, phosphorus, magnesium and copper. Amino acid profile showed that nineteen of the commonly occurring amino acids except tryptophan were present. The nutrient composition of V. coleoptera is comparable to those of conventional animal source foods such as beef and fish. Conclusion: It is concluded that processing and consumption of grub worms could add to nutrient intake and variety to staple foods of indigenous communities. When properly harnessed and large scale production and commercialization are explored, it can be a good source of livelihood for families especially in poor resource settings.

Speaker
Biography:

Daniel S Peiffer is a researcher working at medical college of Wisconsin. His main research interests are nutrition and cancer research

Abstract:

Freeze-dried black raspberries (BRB), their component anthocyanins (ACs), and a metabolite of BRB ACs, protocatechuic acid (PCA), inhibit the development of esophagus cancer in rats induced by the carcinogen, N-nitrosomethyl benzyl amine (NMBA). All three components reduce inflammation in the esophagus and in plasma. The present study determined the relation of changes in inflammatory markers to infiltration of innate immune cells into NMBA-treated esophagus. Rats were injected with NMBA (0.35 mg/kg) for five weeks while on control diet. Following NMBA treatment, rats were fed diets containing 6.1% BRB powder, an AC-rich fraction of BRBs (3.8 µmoles/g diet), or 500 ppm PCA. At weeks 15, 25 and 35, inflammatory biomarker expression in the plasma and esophagus was quantified and infiltration of immune cells in the esophagus was examined. At all three time points, BRB, AC, and PCA similarly affected cytokine production in the esophagus and plasma of NMBA-treated rats, relative to the NMBA-only control. These included decreased expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL1β, and increased the expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL10. Moreover, all three diets also increased the expression of IL12, a cytokine that activates both cytolytic NK and CD8+ T cells. Additionally, the three diets also decreased infiltration of both macrophages and neutrophils into the esophagus. Overall, our results suggest that another mechanism by which BRBs, ACs, and PCA inhibit NMBA-induced esophageal tumorigenesis is by altering cytokine expression and innate immune cell–trafficking into tumor tissues.

Bai Li

University of Birmingham, UK

Title: Preventing childhood obesity in China
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Bai Li (PhD in Public Health and Epidemiology) is from the College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, UK. Dr Li’s primary research interests include societal/environmental determinants and prevention of childhood obesity and other preventable chronic diseases.

Abstract:

Over the last two decades, the rate of increase in childhood obesity in China exceeded the trends seen in many other countries. Over 30 million Chinese children between the ages of 7 to 18 years are overweight or obese. However, research on contributing factors is limited. Existing prevention programs are inadequate in quantity; they also lack rigorous scientific development involving community members and consideration on sustainability. My talk will begin with an overview on the epidemic of childhood obesity in China, highlighting the key research gaps in this country with regard to environmental risk factors and rigorous development and evaluation of prevention programs. The discussion will then focus on my recently published mixed methods study of environmental risk factors of obesity in Chinese children. We will look at how the findings of this study, alongside the findings of a large complementary qualitative study (undertaken in partnership with a Chinese Centre of Diseases Prevention and Control) informed the design and implementation of the feasibility trial (completed in June 2015) of the CHInese pRimary school children PhYsical activity and DietaRy behAviour chanGes InterventiON (CHIRPY DRAGON program). The results and implications of the feasibility trial will be presented. The effectiveness and cost effectiveness of the finalized CHIRPY DRAGON program will be evaluated through a randomized controlled trial in the city of Guangzhou, involving 40 primary schools (n=1640). The British Consulate in China and the Mayor of Guangzhou city will launch the program in September 2015. The growth journey of CHIRPY DRAGON demonstrates how scientists can engage with public members, stakeholders and policy makers in every stage of intervention development to tackle the rising epidemic of childhood obesity in a country that has undergone rapid socio-economic and nutritional transitions.

Speaker
Biography:

Caterina Brasacchio is a PhD student in Molecular and Translational Medicine at the University of Milan, Italy. She attends her PhD at the Nephrology and Nutrition Laboratory in the Department of Health Sciences, San Paolo Hospital (Milan, Italy). She has a Master degree in Science of Biology applied to Nutrition. She is member of SIOMMMS (Italian Society of Osteoporosis, Mineral Metabolism and Skeleton Disease). She has published 5 papers about nutrition in nephrolithiasis, nutrition and Mediterranean diet, risk of kidney stones in patients with specific genotype. She has participated at NUTRIMI congress (National Congress of Nutrition in Milan).

Abstract:

According to World Health Organization data, the leading causes of death are cardiovascular diseases (CD). Nutritional studies demonstrated a protective role of antioxidants against CD, cancer and obesity. The European study ATHENA aims to study the beneficial effects of antioxidants on human health. We investigated the dietary intake of anthocyanin, vitamin C, vitamin E and beta-carotene in relation to some of cardiovascular risk parameters (BMI, waist circumference, cholesterol LDL and HDL, LDL/HDL ratio, triglycerides) in 493 Caucasian subjects divided in two groups: Group 1 (low antioxidants intake) vs. Group 2 (high antioxidants intake). Statistical analysis was performed using STATA 10 Software. The Group 2 showed lower BMI, waist circumference, cholesterol LDL and LDL/HDL ratio than Group 1. Multiple linear regression, evidenced that in Group 2 a large vitamin C intake was associated to lower LDL (p=0.0015) while a high beta-carotene intake was correlated with higher HDL (p=0.026). If they were assumed together we observed a correlation with a lower LDL/HDL ratio, waist circumference and triglycerides (p=0.005, p=0.033, p=0.037 respectively). Furthermore, the elevate anthocyanin consumption was correlated with lower triglycerides and waist circumference (p=0.01), but when anthocyanin was taken in association with vitamin C and beta-carotene there was a correlation with lower BMI also (p=0.024). In conclusion, a diet with high intake of antioxidants is linked to a reduced CD risk parameters, with major influence of vitamin C and beta-carotene.