Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 5th European Nutrition and Dietetics Conference Holiday inn Rome- Aurelia, Rome, Italy.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Mario Ciampolini

University of Florence, Italy

Keynote: Learning the recognition of Initial Hunger (IH)

Time : 09:35-10:05

Conference Series Nutrition Congress 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker  Mario Ciampolini photo
Biography:

Mario Ciampolini is a retired professor from Università di Firenze, Dept Pediatrics, directed the Gastroenterology Research Unit, a third level referral center in the department of Pediatrics of the University of Florence (Meyer hospital) for 40 years. He worked at the Cornell University for a joined research with the University of Florence on energy expenditure in children. Three students came from Amsterdam Medical Center to learn “Recognizing Hunger” he made the first diagnoses of celiac disease in Tuscany and published 130 scientific articles, about 40 in international Press.

Abstract:

Background: The will to eat is a decision associated with conditioned responses and with unconditioned body sensations that reflect changes in metabolic biomarkers. The body feelings described as hunger have often components that are conditioned by time, social behavior and sight of food. Blood glucose is a biomarker of current energy availability and of hunger. Extensive rat and human studies showed that blood glucose declines coincided with spontaneous feelings of hunger, with metabolic insufficiency and meal initiation. Objectives: Investigating whether the decision to eat can be delayed until blood glucose is allowed to fall to low levels, when feeding behavior is (mostly) unconditioned. Methods: 7-week pilot study was carried out. 158 adults suffering from diarrhea, abdominal pain, and dyspepsia were recruited and randomized to experimental (trained; n=80) and control (untrained; n=78) groups. Subjects of experimental group were trained to ignore meal times and to pay attention to their earliest sensations of hunger or discomfort, so to measure glucose concentrations (blood glucose, BG) with glucometer. They were instructed to associate their sensations of hunger with BG value. The control group followed their normal routine. In the final investigative session (after compilation of a 7 days dairy) all patients were asked to estimate their preprandial BG and a blood sample was taken to measure BG through a glucose autoanalyzer. Results: At the end of the 7-week training period, estimated and measured glycemic values were found to be linearly correlated in the trained group (r=0.82; p=0.0001) but not in the control (untrained) group (r=0.10; p=0.40). Fewer subjects in the trained group were hungry than those in the control group (p=0.001). The 18 hungry subjects of the trained group had significantly lower glucose levels (80.1±6.3 mg/dL) than the 42 hungry control subjects (89.2±10.2 mg/dL; p=0.01). Moreover, the trained hungry subjects estimated their BG (78.1±6.7 mg/dL; estimation error: 3.2±2.4% of the measured BG) more accurately than the control group (75.9±9.8 mg/dL; estimation error: 16.7±11.0%; p=0.0001). In addiction the estimation error of the entire trained group (4.7 ± 3.6%) was significantly lower than that of the control subjects (17.1±11.5%; p=0.0001). Conclusion: Patients could be trained to accurately estimate their blood glucose and to recognize their sensations of initial hunger at low glucose concentrations. These results suggest that it is possible to learn a behavioral distinction between unconditioned and conditioned hunger, and to modulate intake to achieve three IH arousals per day.

Break: Networking & Refreshments Break 10:05-10:25 @ Foyer Area

Keynote Forum

Martyn Caplin

Royal Free Hospital, UK

Keynote: Diet and cancer: Can superfoods or dietary supplements help?

Time : 10:25-10:55

Conference Series Nutrition Congress 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker  Martyn Caplin photo
Biography:

Martyn Caplin is a Professor of Gastroenterology & GI Neuroendocrinology at the Royal Free Hospital and University College London. He has published over one hundred and fifty peer review papers, written multiple book chapters and co-authored two books. He regularly lectures both nationally and internationally. From 2006-2012, he was the Clinical Lead for “NHS Evidence” for Gastroenterology and Liver diseases. He was a Member of the National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) upper-G.I. Cancer Committee 2006-2014. He is an international expert in Neuroendocrine Tumours and is the Chair of the European Neuroendocrine Tumor Society. He has received a Lifetime Achievement Award from the UK & Ireland Neuroendocrine Tumour Society in recognition of his Clinical Leadership and Research in the field of NETs.

Abstract:

The recent press has highlighted that our lifetime chance of developing cancer is almost 1 in 2. The World Cancer Research Fund and the American Institute for Cancer Research suggest that most cancer is preventable, through a combination of smoking/tobacco avoidance, appropriate diet, regular physical activity and maintaining a healthy body weight. We know there is a strong link between diet and cancer, although it is very complex. Expert consensus suggests 9-40% of cancers are directly linked to diet and this risk is even greater if you are obese. Eating a healthy balanced diet that is high in fibre, fruit and vegetables and low in red and processed meat and salt can reduce cancer risk. ‘Superfoods’ with anti-cancer properties have hit the headlines and while there may be some evidence that the chemicals in these foods have positive health benefits, most of the studies have been conducted in a laboratory with limited large scale studies. The World Health Organization (WHO) the EPIC study, involving more than half a million people in 10 European countries followed for almost 15 years. The study found strong evidence that higher levels of vitamin D are associated with a reduced risk of colorectal cancer and better survival outcomes; dietary fibre protects against colon cancer; high intake of fat predisposes to breast cancer; diets high in flavonoids can reduce the risk of primary liver cancer and bladder cancer; and many more similar conclusions related to vitamin levels, diet and cancer. Other smaller studies point to the potential anti-cancer properties of a variety of diet derived chemicals including lycopene (from tomatoes), curcumin (from turmeric) and catechins (from green tea). Lycopene is a powerful antioxidant that has been linked to a reduced risk of prostate cancer, breast cancer and liver disease/cancer. Studies suggest that curcumin inhibits many of mechanisms responsible for the development of cancer and may reduce the risk of a range of different cancers including those of the breast, bowel, pancreas and liver. There are also for example clinical trials of curcumin being added to chemotherapy in the treatment of advanced bowel cancer as previous experimental studies had shown benefit of the combination over chemotherapy alone. Green tea contains high levels of catechins, which have been shown in the laboratory to prevent the activation of oncogenic pathways and block the growth of tumour cells. Consumption of green tea has been linked with a reduction in the risk of bowel, prostate and pancreatic cancers. However not all vitamins are good for you. For example selenium which may be good for pancreatic conditions can be bad for you in combination with vitamin E if you have advanced prostate cancer. People who understand the importance of good nutrition on reducing their cancer risk often seek to augment their diets by eating specific foods or taking vitamins or supplements. However if going down the route of supplementation then the appropriate dosage and bioavailability are just two of the key factors. The message that most cancer is preventable has not as yet stimulated a population reaction or political agenda.

  • Track 01: Clinical Nutrition & Sports Nutrition
    Track 02: Malnutrition and Nutritional Disorders
    Track 03: Plant Nutrition, Nutrition- Health and Choice
    Track 04: Diet in Obesity & Gastrointestinal Disorders
Location: Olimpica 3 & 4
Speaker

Chair

John Ellis Agens

Florida State University, USA

Speaker

Co-Chair

Marica Bakovic

Marica Bakovic

Session Introduction

Pedro Javier Siquier Homar

Hospital Comarcal de Inca, Spain

Title: Development of integrated support software for clinical nutrition

Time : 11:25-11:45

Speaker
Biography:

Pedro Javier Siquier Homar has completed his Pharmacy degree from Santiago de Compostela University and Hospital Pharmacist studies from Complexo Hospitalario Universitario de Vigo. He is the Hospital Pharmacist of compounding area at Hospital Comarcal de Inca and the Director of Salutic Developments, a premier Bio-Soft service organization.

Abstract:

Objectives: To develop an integrated computer software application for specialized nutritional support, integrated in the electronic clinical record, which detects automatically and early those undernourished patients or at risk of developing undernourishment, determining points of opportunity for improvement and evaluation of the results. Methods: The quality standards published by the Nutrition Work Group of the Spanish Society of Hospital Pharmacy (SEFH) and the recommendations by the Pharmacy Group of the Spanish Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (SENPE) have been taken into account. According to these quality standards, the nutritional support has to include the following healthcare stages or sub-processes: Nutritional screening, nutritional assessment and plan for nutritional care, prescription, preparation and administration. Results: This software allows conducting in an automated way, a specific nutritional assessment for those patients with nutritional risk, implementing, if necessary, a nutritional treatment plan, conducting follow up and traceability of outcomes derived from the implementation of improvement actions and quantifying to what extent our practice is close to the established standard. Conclusions: This software allows standardizing the specialized nutritional support from a multidisciplinary point of view, introducing the concept of quality control per processes and including patient as the main customer.

Speaker
Biography:

Teruyoshi Amagai has completed his MD and PhD from University of Tsukuba, Japan and Clinical Practice from the Birmingham Children’s Hospital in UK during 1993 and 1994. He is the Professor of Mukogawa Women’s University since 2007 and has been In-charge of drawing up member, “Dietary Reference Intakes for Japanese (2015), developed by the Ministry of Health Labor and Welfare, Japanese Government. He is the Editorial Member, Nutrition in Clinical Practice, academic journal of American Society for Parent and Enteral Nutrition (ASPEN).

Abstract:

Background: The American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition recommends hypocaloric, high protein feeding for critically ill patients with a body mass index (BMI) of ≥30.0 kg/m2. However, Asians have a high prevalence of type-2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular risk factors even with a BMI of <25.0 kg/m2. Therefore, the optimal energy intake for critically ill, overweight/obese Asian patients remains unclear. Methods: A retrospective chart review was conducted in mechanically ventilated patients with a BMI of ≥25.0 kg/m2 in an emergency intensive care unit (EICU). Patients were categorized into two groups according to the percentage of energy intake/requirement during the first week in EICU: Group L, <50%; Group M, ≥50%. Energy requirement was estimated using the Penn State equation. Results: A total of 72 patients were included in the study. The median age and BMI of all patients was 66.2 years and 27.5 kg/m2, respectively. No significant differences were observed between the two groups for all-cause mortality, ICU-free days or length of hospital stay. Ventilator-free days (VFDs) were significantly higher in Group L than in Group M (20.0 [15.5-24.5] vs. 17.0 [2.0-21.0] days; P=0.042). However, when a multivariate regression analysis was performed to adjust for primary diagnosis, we found that % energy intake/requirement was not independently associated with VFDs (regression coefficient=0.019; 95% confidence interval, −0.115–0.076). Conclusion: Energy intake in the first week in EICU did not influence clinical outcomes in critically ill, overweight Japanese patients. Further large sample randomized trials are needed to confirm the results of this study.

Speaker
Biography:

Marica Bakovic has completed her BSc in Chemistry and PhD in Biological Chemistry at the University of Alberta. She has received Postdoctoral awards from Medical Research Council and Alberta Heritage Foundation. Before coming to the University of Guelph, she has worked in the area of molecular and cell biology of lipid metabolism at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Alberta. Currently, she is a Professor in the Department of Human Health and Nutritional Sciences at the University of Guelph. She has a long lasting interest in nutrition and metabolism, especially in the area of regulation of membrane phospholipids, fatty acids and methyl group donors.

Abstract:

It is well known that it is beneficial to reduce fatty acid availability in obesity however there is an unmet need for discovering new dietary compounds that can reduce fat accumulation and stimulate fatty acid oxidation under conditions of elevated obesity. We established that dietary choline could inhibit fatty acid formation by lipogenesis and stimulate mitochondrial oxidation. Metabolomic analysis of plasma and tissues established that choline supplementation stimulates one carbon cycle, membrane phospholipid turnover and adipose tissues triglyceride degradation by lipolysis, strongly directing fatty acids towards oxidation in a Pcyt2 deficient mouse model of metabolic syndrome. The extensive metabolic studies as well as analyses of the gene expression and insulin signaling pathways provided strong evidence for a direct stimulation of fatty acid metabolism with dietary choline. The impact of this work is not only how to expand the future use of choline but also to continue to investigate the regulation of the membrane phospholipid turnover and the basic function of the lipid regulator Pcyt2. This is the first time to be demonstrated that choline stimulates membrane biogenesis and mitochondrial metabolism under pathological conditions of metabolic syndrome.

Speaker
Biography:

John Ellis Agens has received his MD degree from Rutgers Medical School in 1986. He is board certified in Internal Medicine and Geriatrics. He began in solo Internal Medicine Practice in his hometown in New Jersey and then served 10 years as Geriatrician at Mayo Health System. In 2003, he has moved to Tallahassee, Florida as a Director of the Center for Chronic Care at Capital Health Plan while serving as Clinical Assistant Professor at Florida State University College of Medicine. In 2008, he became an Associate Professor and Geriatrics Clerkship Director for the required fourth year medical student experience.

Abstract:

Recent surveys of US medical schools suggest the number of hours dedicated to nutrition continue to be inadequate. Our fourth year medical students take a required geriatrics clerkship under the supervision of our faculty and write separate patient summaries in each of three areas: Complete functional assessment, comprehensive medication review and advanced illness/palliative care. They are increasingly asked to comment on nutritional status and plan on their complete functional assessment and advanced illness/palliative care patient care assignments with recent emphasis in the syllabus. After graduation, consenting students had their written reports studied in research approved by the IRB of Florida State University. Research Question: We hypothesized that over three academic years all students would make more comments on their selected patient’s nutritional status. 73 students comprised of three cohorts consented to have their assignments reviewed. These cohorts represented each of three academic years spanning 2013-2016. Assignments essentially represented 73 patients having a complete functional assessment and 73 patients with an advanced illness reflection by the students. Patients were of mean age 78 years. Almost half had cognitive impairment or dementia. Well over half were in a skilled nursing facility or assisted living facility. In the advanced illness patients, nutritional status was addressed by students in 52%, 39% and 56% of the cases with the greatest percentage in the most recent academic year. In the complete functional assessment, nutritional status was addressed by students in 13%, 24% and 50% of the cases with the greatest percentage in the most recent academic year.

Break: Lunch Break 12:45-13:35 @ Restaurant

Martyn Caplin

Royal Free Hospital, UK

Title: The role of diet and supplementation in inflammatory bowel disease

Time : 13:35-13:55

Speaker
Biography:

Martyn Caplin is a Professor of Gastroenterology & GI Neuroendocrinology at the Royal Free Hospital and University College London. He has published over one hundred and fifty peer review papers, written multiple book chapters and co-authored two books. He regularly lectures both nationally and internationally. From 2006-2012, he was the Clinical Lead for “NHS Evidence” for Gastroenterology and Liver diseases. He was a Member of the National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) upper-G.I. Cancer Committee 2006-2014. He is an international expert in Neuroendocrine Tumours and is the Chair of the European Neuroendocrine Tumor Society. He has received a Lifetime Achievement Award from the UK & Ireland Neuroendocrine Tumour Society in recognition of his Clinical Leadership and Research in the field of NETs.

Abstract:

Background & Aims: Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD) is chronic immune disorders of unclear etiology, in which the gastrointestinal tract is inflamed. Diet may be a potential pathogenic factor in the development of IBD and patients often take food supplements with no evidence base. We have thus assessed the evidence for food supplements in the management of IBD. Methods: A PubMed search was performed for the terms: Inflammatory bowel disease; nutritional deficiencies; dietary supplements; curcumin; green tea; vitamin D and other vitamins; folic acid; iron; zinc; probiotics; Andrographis paniculata and Boswellia serrate. PubMed was used to search for all relevant articles published during 1975-2015. Results: The most evidence was for curcumin, green tea, vitamin D and probiotics. Curcumin supplementation has been reported to be effective in reducing both the symptoms and the inflammatory indices in IBD patients. Similar results have been observed for green tea, however pertinent studies are limited. Vitamin D supplementation may help to both increase bone mineral density in patients with IBD and to reduce disease activity. IBD patients with ileal resections >20 cm may develop vitamin B12 deficiency which requires parenteral supplementation. Conversely, there is no current evidence to support fat soluble vitamin supplementation in IBD patients. Probiotics, particularly VSL#3, appears to reduce disease activity in IBD patients with pouchitis. Complementary and alternative medicines are used by IBD patients and some in vitro and animal studies have showed promising results. Conclusion: Attention to dietary factors such as curcumin, green tea and vitamins, including vitamin D and vitamin B12, appears to be beneficial and, if necessary, supplementation may be appropriate.

Speaker
Biography:

Kaj Winther has specialized in Clinical Biochemistry. After working on the circadian variation of myocardial infarction at the Harvard Medical School, he showed more interest in herbal remedies and their impact on inflammation. He was the Director of the Department of Clinical Biochemistry at University Hospitals in Copenhagen. Since 2015 he serves as an Affiliated Professor at the Institute of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, University of Copenhagen.

Abstract:

The common cold is a widespread disease worldwide with great social and economic implication. The goal of this study was to test if a liquid form of a standardized rose hip preparation-Hyben-Vital, based mainly on shells of selected sub-species of Rosa canina L. (Rosacea), might reduce the incidence and symptoms of the common cold. A number of 120 middle-aged to elderly volunteers, mean age 61.5±7.3 years, were randomly allocated to daily treatments with either 2 g of the liquid rose hip preparation (RH) or placebo (P) for six months during the winter. Effect variables were the frequency of colds registered, the occurrence and severity of reported symptoms and general stiffness of muscles. In the RH-group 43% of volunteers reported cold as compared to 53% in the P group (p=0.348). After two month of treatment the numbers of volunteers (% incidence) who reported the different symptoms of cold in RH-group vs. P-group were: Pain in throat: 4% vs. 16%, (p=0.051); Muscus in nose: 8% vs. 20% (p=0.091); Headaches: 6% vs. 18%, p=0.072); and Fatigue: 8% vs. 21%, p=0.054); similar trend after 6 month treatment. Stiffness of muscles, evaluated over 6 month changed from initially: 2.40±2.32 to 2.02±2.15 in the RH group and from 2.37±2.40 to 2.93±2.50 in the P group, p=0.043 comparing groups. Our data suggests that administration of liquid rose hip might reduce the incidence of colds and lower the number of patients reporting the different symptoms of cold.

Speaker
Biography:

Ernst Vermaak begins his professional career in 1973, working at the Academic Hospital in Bloemfontein, South Africa till 1999 and also received degree M.Med.Sc. He has then worked as Senior Lecturer at the Central University of Technology, Free State and obtained a Research Doctorate for work done on HIV, Nutrition, Immunology and Pulmonary Function.

Abstract:

To maintain good health a person needs to consume a well balanced diet. This is even more relevant regarding HIV infection and AIDS. Nutritional status of HIV infected individuals is important as malnutrition is associated with an increased death rate. Chronic inflammation caused by HIV infection increases the metabolic needs of the human body and may lead to the depletion of essential nutrients resulting in a malnourished person with reduced immunity (PubMed). The study determined the baseline dietary intake of 40 HIV infected individuals living in Central South Africa. Dietary intake was determined using a validated Quantitative Food Frequency Questionnaire with a 90% reliability to determine types and quantities of food and drinks consumed by participants during six months prior to data collection. Macro and micronu¬trient intake was assessed with an analytical program (FoodFinder, Medical Research Counsel, South Africa). The median and mean energy and macronutrient intake for both male and female HIV infected individuals were higher than the Estimated Energy Requirement (EER) and Recommended Dietary Intake (RDA) or Adequate Intake (AI). Inadequate intakes of calcium, selenium, folate and iodine were demonstrated. Vitamin A, D, E and K were also compromised with inadequate intakes. The results emphasize the need for nutritional intervention to ensure adequate dietary intake in these HIV infected individuals. Participants received daily selected nutritional supplementation with monthly visits to the clinic. The results show statistical significant decreases (p<0.0001) in the median viral load values of the study population and a stable CD4/CD8 count. Therefore nutritional supplementation may delay the onset of AIDS.

Speaker
Biography:

Neeta Singh has completed his PhD from Oregon State University followed by MBA in International Affairs and she is a Registered Dietitian. She serves as Chair of Nutrition Program with School of Mathematics, Science & Engineering at University of Incarnate, San Antonio, Texas. Her initial research was in artificial intelligence applications in areas of food aid distribution. From past 7 years she has been working on various food sustainability projects as means of improving nutritional status among rural population in the Republic of Tanzania. She has presented her work at various international venues, published in books and has been serving as an Editorial Board Member of several international journals.

Abstract:

Today, close to 1.2 billion people, approximately a fifth of the world’s population continues to live in conditions of abject poverty and almost 800 million people in the developing world are chronically hungry. A basic right to adequate and nutritious food, which most people take for granted, remains a distant dream for those who struggle with food shortages every day of their lives. The presence of extreme poverty and hunger on such a vast scale in a world of apparent opulence is a moral outrage. Evidence-based strategies for nutrition intervention commonly address direct determinants such as food/nutrient intake, whereas community-based intervention tends to take more holistic approach resulting in greater efficacy when combined with other proximal determinants such as women’s economic and social empowerment. We need to address not simply the immediate causes of malnutrition, but also their underlying and basic factors if we are to achieve nutritional well-being and reach full potential for functional and productive capacity in a population. It is thus imperative that food and nutrition programs succeed and that success is sustained. In the case of Bukoba rural, Republic of Tanzania identified direct determinants of undernutrition were lack of availability, accessibility and utilization of food whereas identified proximal determinants were women’s lack of sustainable purchasing power, decision making power, business acumen and horticultural and technical assistance. The proximal determinants imply the lack of women person and social empowerment in their family and community context. These data lead to a cooperative farming project creating a collective way to cultivate soybean crops to improve the quality of the existing diet (direct determinants) and an infrastructure to effect the women’s economic sustainability and empowerment (proximal determinants). The success of ongoing programs suggests when feeding programs and food-based safety nets are supplied from local production, there is a double benefit; not only are the hungry fed but local markets for food expand, opening income-earning and employment opportunities for the poor thereby creating sustainability. The body of evidence clearly suggests that nutrition interventions work best when it is designed with long-term sustainability as an explicit goal.

Speaker
Biography:

Jasminka Z Ilich is the Hazel Stiebeling Professor of Nutrition at the Florida State University. She has earned her PhD at the Ohio State University and the University of Zagreb, Croatia in Medicinal Sciences and her MS at the University of Utah in Foods and Nutrition. Her research includes clinical studies in older women with nutritional interventions incorporating behavioral modification and modes of physical activity for augmentation of bone and body composition. She has recently identified a triad incorporating bone loss, muscle loss and adipose tissue expansion and termed it “osteosarcopenic obesity syndrome”. Recently, she started investigating the newly discovered hormone irisin, in connection with brown-fat, beige-fat activation. Her research also includes outreach to underserved communities for education and health promotion interventions to foster obesity prevention, improvement in cardiovascular risk factors and overall healthier lifestyle. On the molecular level, she investigates nutritional influences on mesenchymal stem cell differentiation into osteoblasts and adipocytes lineages and cross-talk with myocytes.

Abstract:

The causes of overweight/obesity are numerous. Besides energy intake, various foods and nutrients have been implicated to impede or facilitate body weight/fat accumulation. Our objective was to investigate whether weight loss could be achieved easier with calcium (Ca) supplements or low-fat dairy products both as complements to the underlying hypocaloric diets. A special emphasis was placed on assessing body composition, fat distribution and changes in visceral fat. The study followed overweight/obese early-postmenopausal women over a 6 month-period, divided into 3 groups: Supplement (pills containing 630 mg Ca+400 IU of vitamin D/day); Dairy (low-fat dairy consumption, 4-5 servings/day); and Control (placebo pills). Each group included moderate energy restriction (~85% of energy needs). Anthropometry, including circumferences was measured by standard methods. Body composition of total body as well as android and gynoid regions, including fat and lean tissue was measured by lunar iDXA densitometer. A total of n=97 participants completed the 6 months follow-up and had complete data-sets. Overall, the participants lost 4.0% of body weight and 3.5% of body fat. The decrease in android and total body fat was the highest in the Dairy group, while the decrease in gynoid fat was significantly higher in Supplement and Dairy group compared to the Control group. The decrease of android and total body lean mass was significantly lower in Dairy group compared to two other groups, while the loss in gynoid lean mass was significantly higher in Dairy group. In conclusion, the hypocaloric diets with increased Ca intake either via low-fat dairy products or via Ca supplements was associated with greater body weight and fat loss supporting a healthier body composition, in comparison to the control group, with the best outcomes in a low-fat dairy group.

Speaker
Biography:

Elena T Carbone is a health education/nutrition communications researcher. Her mixed methods work with communities integrates behavioral interventions to promote health and prevent complications related to obesity, diabetes and cancer. She is Associate Professor/Graduate Program Director of Nutrition and Founding Director of the Community-Engaged Research Program at UMass Amherst. She is a Registered Dietitian, a Gustolab Institute Visiting Professor and Editorial Board Member of several journals. She has made over 100 presentations nationally/internationally and authored over 30 peer-reviewed publications. She has received multiple awards for her contributions to the field of nutrition, most recently from Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior.

Abstract:

Although still relatively low as compared to the US, Italy’s obesity rates and diet-related health problems are rising. Concurrent with this has been an increase in fast food restaurants and an influx of Westernized eating and work habits. Italy in general and Rome in particular, has a long and fascinating food history. Italy is the birthplace of the Slow Food movement (established in response to the opening of McDonald’s in Rome in 1986); it is also where artisanal foods and culinary traditions are part of the fabric of everyday life. Long before food was categorized as “fast” or “slow,” Rome’s cobblestone streets were lined with Botteghe Storiche -public places in ancient Rome where food was sold and Romans could eat, drink or sleep and hear news of the day. These shops are fast-disappearing, but there is a movement to preserve them. Today, an estimated 120 sites have obtained the title of Bottegastorica from the municipality of Rome. In their 2003 article “Return to traditional values? A case study of Slow Food” Jones and colleagues conclude that, “while slow food provides a valuable contrast to the seemingly all powerful fast food industry it seems unlikely to be able to promote widespread changes in the modern world’s eating habits.” In this presentation, we reexamine this conclusion by exploring Rome’s culinary traditions and how its food preparation methods, eating habits and cultural heritage have both shaped and been challenged by the passage of time.

Break: Networking & Refreshments Break 15:35-15:55 @ Foyer Area
Speaker
Biography:

Teruyoshi Amagai has completed his MD and PhD from University of Tsukuba, Japan and Clinical Practice from the Birmingham Children’s Hospital in UK during 1993 and 1994. He is the Professor of Mukogawa Women’s University since 2007 and has been In-charge of drawing up member, “Dietary Reference Intakes for Japanese (2015), developed by the Ministry of Health Labor and Welfare, Japanese Government. He is the Editorial Member, Nutrition in Clinical Practice, academic journal of American Society for Parent and Enteral Nutrition (ASPEN).

Abstract:

Backgrounds: Human beings lives in 21st century have been struck by numerous disasters, such as earthquake, Tsunami, typhoon and nuclear accidents. However, to our knowledge, no common concepts to save victims’ health from nutritional standing points exist. Aim: To propose a novel nomenclature “Disaster Nutrition” (DN). Methods: Defining “Disaster Nutirion” DN as nutrition status and nutritional supports around disaster. Then, the validity of this novel concept in the latest disaster struck Japan in 11, Mar,2011, the Great East Japan Earthquake Disaster” (GEJED) were examined with data reported by mainly Japanese Government. Facts: Nutritional surveys have been poorly conducted; although relatively abundant nutritional interventions had been undertaken. The victims of GEJED were the older adults, children and handicapped persons as disaster challenged so that disaster related death (DRD) defined as death from indirect death after the disaster attack was mainly observed in these victims. The novel nomenclature of DN might save these disaster challenged. Proposal: The establishment of DN and to educate this in the non disaster times must be started as soon as possible all over the world to save the number of DRD.

Speaker
Biography:

Zahra Alizadeh has completed her Sports Medicine Specialty from School of Medicine in Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran. She has founded Obesity Clinic in the Sports Medicine Department at related hospital, the first multidisciplinary obesity clinic in the Tehran University. She is also the Director of sports nutrition research group in Sports Medicine Research Center. She has published more than 10 papers about obesity and exercise.

Abstract:

In recent decades, obesity has become a major health problem. So far, several studies have showed that physical activity is related to creating negative energy balance and changes in appetite directly. However, few of the studies examined the effect of exercise time during the day on these factors. The main aim of the present study was demonstrating the effect of 6 weeks morning and evening aerobic exercise on appetite and anthropometric indices. Forty eight overweight females were recruited in this clinical trial. By the time of exercise, they were divided into two groups (morning or evening) and performed 6 weeks of aerobic exercise with the target heart rate on the ventilatory threshold. Appetite change, calorie intake and anthropometric indices were assessed. All of the variables were compared between two groups and within groups at baseline in the third and sixth week. Some parameters of appetite indices were changed significantly in morning and evening exercise groups in time point’s measurements. However, consistent changes in the appetite scores were not found along the 6 weeks (P>0.05). Calorie consumption of the morning group decreased along the 6 weeks significantly greater than evening group (P=0.02). In addition, significant changes in weight, BMI, abdominal skin fold thickness and abdominal circumference were seen in the morning group (P<0.05). It seems that moderate to high intensity aerobic exercise in the morning along 6 weeks could be considered as a more effective program than evening exercise on appetite control, calorie intake and weight loss.

N Arlappa

Indian Council of Medical Research, India

Title: Magnitude of multiple micro-nutrient malnutrition among the rural children in India

Time : 16:40-17:00

Speaker
Biography:

N Arlappa has completed his MD in Community Medicine from NTR University of Medical Sciences, India. He has been working as Nutrition Scientist in the Division of Community Studies, National Institute of Nutrition (NIN), Indian Council of Medical Research, Hyderabad, India, since 1997. He has 18 years research of experience in the field of Public Health Nutrition and published more than 50 scientific papers in peer-reviewed national and international journals. He has also published 4 book chapters, completed more than 40 research studies and published more than 250 technical reports. He has attended and presented more than 25 scientific papers in national and international conferences/workshops. He is the Faculty Member for the Courses of MPH (NIE), MSc (Nutrition) and PG Certificate course in Applied Nutrition at NIN and currently working as a Deputy Director.

Abstract:

Introduction: In spite of the green revolution and implementation of several national nutrition programs for more than four decades, the prevalence of undernutrition continues to be a major public health problem in India. Almost all the age and physiological groups in general and below five and school-age children, in particular are most vulnerable to malnutrition. India has the highest percent of undernourished and stunted children in world. The burden of hidden hunger i.e., multiple micro-nutrient malnutrition among the children of below five and school-age (7-12 years) children is a major nutritional problem of public health concern in India. Objective: To assess the magnitude of micro-nutrient deficiencies among the rural pre-school and school-age children in India. Materials & Methods: A community based cross sectional study was carried out by the National Nutrition Monitoring Bureau (NNMB) during 2011-12 in 10 major states constituting two third geographical area of India by covering 12,004 (5,810 children of 1-6 years and 6,194) rural children. A one day (24 hour) recall diet survey was carried out to assess their dietary consumption and the median nutrient intakes were calculated and compared them with the Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDAs). The deficit intake of each Nutrient (Against their RDAs) and Adequacy (consumption≥70% of RDA) status of various nutrients were assessed. Results: In general, the rural children were subsisting on inadequate diets and the intakes of all the nutrients except for proteins were below the RDAs. The proportion of children consuming adequate (≥70% of RDA) amounts of nutrients was poor with respect to vitamin A (10-12%) followed by calcium (15-16%), riboflavin (19.4-32.8), iron (27.8-34.8%) and vitamin C (14.6-31.8%). Similarly, the deficit intake of micro-nutrients as against their RDAs was highest for vitamin A (81.5-86.4%) followed by calcium (66-72%), iron (45-53%), riboflavin (50-53%) and vitamin C (49-63%). Likewise, the proportion of the rural children not meeting even 50% of their RDAs was 80-87% for vitamin A, 71-74% for Calcium, 51-59% for Riboflavin and 50-77% for Vitamin C and this proportion is significantly high among the children of marginalized communities, illiterate parents, laborers and those residing in the household where the facility of sanitary latrine is absent (p<0.001). Conclusions: In general, the rural children in India were subsisting on in adequate diets with gross deficit in multiple micronutrients. Hence, appropriate nutrition interventions to be initiated to meet suggested levels of all micronutrients and nutrition education to be imparted to the community.

Speaker
Biography:

Masako Itoh has completed her Bachelor of Home Economics at Showa Women’s University and she is currently working as a Director of Department of Nutrition, Kikai Tokushukai Hospital, Japan.

Abstract:

Aim: To examine an effect of novel enteral formula with collagen peptide (CP) on outcome in patients with pressure ulcer (PU). Methods: All consecutive patients with PU treated in a single institute, between January 2013 and September 2015, were enrolled. The present study was conducted in a retrospective chart-review fashion. To examine an impact of CP formula on outcome in PU patients, the following data were collected: Demographics: Sex, age and actual body weight measured on admission. Nutritional supports: Actual energy and protein intake between treatment days which was defined as days between start (T1) and healing (T2) of individual PU, then cumulative energy and protein deficit were calculated, where deficit was defined that actual minus target values during treatment days. PU severity: DESIGN-R scoring, higher score means severity. Outcome indicators: Treatment days, difference of DESIGN-R score between T1 and T2. Then after subjects were divided into two groups with and without CP, collected data were compared. Results: To focus on quick improvement for PU to save medical budget, subject was limited them with 14 days to examine direct CP impact. As the results, 36 subjects were enrolled out of 75. Compared all data between two groups, iPU was more severe and longer period were required to heal significantly in CP group (p=0.002, <0.001, respectively). Conclusion: The present study could not draw definitive conclusion to prove effectiveness of CP formulae to treat PU. However, CP might treat to heal relatively severe PU within 14 days.

Homira Agah

Iranian National Institute for Oceanography and Atmospheric Science, Iran

Title: Major fatty acids and biochemical compositions of Ulva fasciata macro algae from Qeshm Island

Time : 17:20-17:40

Speaker
Biography:

Homira Agah has completed her PhD from VUB University (Brussels, Belgium). She is currently working as an Assistant Professor at Iranian National University, Vice President of Research and Technology of Tabarsi Science and Technology University and Managing Director of the NGO “Association of Women and Children Supporting Environmental and Sustainable Development”. She has more than 20 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an Editorial Board Member of repute.

Abstract:

The human body is unable to synthesize essential poly-saturated fatty acids (PUFA), which should be taken in through diet. In this study obtaining these essential fatty acids from algae as one of the novel dietary sources of PUFA was investigated. The green alga Ulva fasciata, which is spread in intertidal zone of the Hormozgan Province at Persian Gulf, was collected from Qeshm Island (26° 58' 0'' N, 56°17'0''E), Iran. As there is limited information about this macro alga in this region, hence in addition to major fatty acid (FA) compositions, biochemical composition of Ulva fasciata were determined to obtain an oil rich in α-linolenic (ALA) essential fatty acid with a low ω6:ω3 ratio and its nutritional value. The biochemical compositions were consisted of moisture, ash, total lipid, Crude Protein (CP), Crude Fiber (CF), Acid Detergent Fiber (ADF), Neutral Detergent Fiber (NDF), Gross Energy (GE), Phosphorus (P), Calcium (Ca), Magnesium (Mg), Iron (FE), Copper (Cu), Zinc (Zn) and Manganese (Mn). The moisture content in the alga was 76.6±0.28%. Total lipid contents of lyophilized Ulva sp. alga, extracted by Soxhlet using methanol for 6 hours was 3.6±0.6%, while lipid content using ethyl ether (EE) in two hours (0.35% dry weight) was much lower due to using different solvent and extraction time. Subsequently the extracted lipid was analyzed by Gas Chromatography with Mass detector (GC-MS). Although the total lipid content in this study was lower than that in comparing with other algae reported in literatures but the composition of fat is certainly interesting because of the high levels of PUFAs (53%). The results revealed that there were 38.9% Ash, 8.5% CP, 0.95% CF, 0.25% ADF, 16.9 % NDF, 1520 cal GE, 0.13 % P, 1.6 % Ca, 4.98% Mg, 3218 ppm Fe, 4.9 ppm Cu, 32 ppm Zn, 70.1 ppm Mn in the Ulva macro alga. The major fatty acids in total lipid were palmitic acid C16:0>Stearic acid C18:0>α-linolenic acid C18:3>Eicosadienoic acid C 20:5>Myristic acid C14:0>Arachidonic acid C18:1>Nervonic acid C24:1>Oleic acid>Heptadecanoic acid>Pentadecanoic acid. According to the results, in addition to the presence of two kinds of omega fatty acids in lipid content of Ulva, the ratio of ω-6 ω-3 was lower than one, which indicates that extracted oil from Ulva fasciata macro-algae is a good candidate for human consumption.

Break: