Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 26th European Nutrition and Dietetics Conference Berlin, Germany.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Marcello Menapace

M&Ms Consulting Ltd, Borehamwood WD6 1QQ, UK

Keynote: Blood type diets: Expanding the theory to practice

Time : 09:15-09:55

Conference Series Nutrition Congress 2020 International Conference Keynote Speaker Marcello Menapace photo
Biography:

Marcello Menapace is a researcher, philosopher, scientist, medical writer, and professional regulatory consultant. He has completed his first Master’s degree at the University of Milan (IT) in Chemistry, his second Master’s degree in Business Administration (MBA) at the London School of Business and Finance in London (UK) and his PhD in Life Science at the H. S. University in Philadelphia (US). He has published several scientific papers on Science, Ethics and Nutrition, has been honorable speaker, chair and co-chair in European and International Conferences and is currently collaborating with Biotech Companies and Journals as Reviewer and Co-Editor.

Abstract:

Recent advances in glycobiology have described the inner workings of the much debated blood type diets (BTD).  The confirmed presence of special sugars (glycans) in all foods explain how and why people of different blood type react differently to food.  All women and men can be effectively divided into four blood groups: A, B, AB and O.  The BTD has been devised empirically but can now be demonstrated theoretically, too.  This characterization of humanity into distinct groups (or constitutions) is neither unique nor a recent discovery.  Traditionally, all medicines have always helped humanity overcome diseases with its own special interventions based on a particular constitution of the individual: most of which focused on adjusting ones diet.  It can be claimed that all non-Western (Eastern) medicines (from Unani, to traditional Chinese medicine, Ayurveda, etc) and Western medicines of the past (especially, traditional Western medicine) acted in this way.  While the number of somatotypes may according to tradition, the fundamental concepts remain the same.  A new paradigm has emerged of late which have futher confirmed the already strong scientific backing to these medicines and traditions: the holobiont.  Through the biological underpinnings of the microbiota-host interactions it is possible to attain a synthesis between the two biotypologies, which are not mutually exclusive.  In this way, each individual can be described as a function of its genetic and physical characteristics.  The result is a new nutritional system, which takes into account both the well-tested traditional suggestions (seasonal foods, etc) and the contemporary biological medicine. 

 

Keynote Forum

Gaia Rocchitta

University of Sassari, Italy

Keynote: The double role of nutrients in Parkinson’s disease
Conference Series Nutrition Congress 2020 International Conference Keynote Speaker Gaia Rocchitta   photo
Biography:

Among neurodegenerative disease Parkinson's disease (PD) represents the second most widespread . Observational studies have linked the occurrence of PD to environmental exposures and lifestyle habits, signifying a huge field of research in order to improve PD prevention or disease modification in populations but also in individuals.Up to now, gene–environment interactions and other factors as chemical exposure, physical activity, dietary habits or smoking have been deepened. From observational studies several low-risk and potentially high-yield recommendations for lifestyle modification have been formulated, in particular, dietary modifications. So, the role nutrition in both neuroprotection and neurodegeneration has become important for neuroscientists and nutritional neuroscientists.Several studies have emphasized that some nutrients may increase an individual risk for PD, while others may be neuroprotective. Such evidences are not unexpected, as some foods are able to impact on the functions of mitochondria, and therefore on the production of free radicals, while others perform very important antioxidant functions, necessary to block the harmful behavior of free radicals. So, it has been demonstrated how a poor diet can determine an increase of oxidative stress impairing the antioxidant defense system, while a well-balanced diet can govern some neuroprotection.Some nutrients, as diary product, have been linked to an augmented risk of PD, while others as phytochemicals, caffeine, genistein, or tea polyphenols and alcohol have been associated with a reduced progression of PD.It exist a lack in epidemiological studies evaluating dietary factors and PD, so those studies would deserve further attention. Moreover, considering critical factors as non-motor symptoms, such as dysphagia, depression, constipation or dehydration, which can substantially impact the quality of the diet, should ameliorate the importance of studies evaluating the role of nutrients in PD.

Abstract:

Gaia Rocchitta has completed her graduation in chemistry in 1999 with a thesis about polyphenols in red wines, then she completed her PhD in Neuroscience at School of Medicine of Sassari University (Italy) in 2004. She was a Postdoctoral fellow at School of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, University College, Dublin (Ireland) in 2006, working on the development of amperometric biosensors for in vivo-monitoring of neurochemical compounds. She currently is a tenured researcher and lecturer in Pharmacology and Nutraceutical at School of Medicine of Sassari University (Italy). She has published more than 50 papers in peer-reviewed journals.

 

  • Nutrition and Public Health | Nutrition and Health | Nutrition and Diabetes | Nutritional Science
Location: Olimpica 1
Biography:

Laila Hussein she is a researcher in National Research Center, Egypt.
Department of Food Sciences and Nutrition and her Molecularl profile of the gut microbiotaamong young and adult Egyptians Epidemiological nutritional studies to assess the intake of selected essential nutrients in re ation to standard norms and formulation and evaluation of the efficiencies of selected fruit rich in phytochemicals and fermented foods rich in probiotics on the colon function and the overall health status among children, adolescents and adults

Abstract:

The characteristics of the gut microbiota in healthy human had been well defined throughout the whole life span. Definite changes in the gut microbiome dysbiosis is closely related to development of chronic inflammation related disease. The modulation of the intestinal microbiome by next generation probiotics (NGP), prebiotics and postbiotics provides novel strategies that may be effectively applied for treatment of such aberrations. The molecular mechanisms by which probiotics and prebiotics exert their action are by modulating signaling pathways of the gut microbiota. NGPs have well defined specific functional characteristics besides the well known ones. Prebiotics are mainly non- starch polysaccharide molecules that resist the acid and enzymatic hydrolysis in the stomach and the gut and reached the colon intact, where they are selectively fermented by the colon microbiota to confer health benefits. The fermentation products including free energy, short chain fatty acids mainly butyrate, the fuel of the colonocyte, low colonic pH lead to numerous health benefits, such as inhibition of the development of pathogens, reducing the prevalence and duration of diarrhoea, increases the absorption of minerals, mostly of magnesium and calcium, and providing relief from inflammation and other symptoms associated with intestinal bowel disorders. Recently, postbiotics have drawn attention and they include metabolic byproducts secreted by live bacteria, such as enzymes, peptides, peptidoglycan, polysaccharides, cell surface proteins, and organic acids. Their clear chemical structure, safety dose parameters, long shelf life and these molecules have various signaling with anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory, anti-obesogenic, antihypertensive, hypocholesterolemic, anti-proliferative, and antioxidant activities properties with impacts on the host health by improving specific physiological functions. In a rapidly growing global market, there is a call to improve and standardize the quality of the products to get reliable high quality multistrain probiotic for clinical practice and for the benefit of the end-users. The market size of the commercial prebiotic human milk oligosaccharides (HMO)  is expected to reach USD 170.4 million by 2024. HMO is incorporated in the formulation of functional foods and beverages to promote the growth of healthy bacteria and eliminate harmful microbes. More work is needed to go beyond the identified association between healthy and disease state gut microbiota. Multiomics and more randomized controlled clinical trials are needed to finally clarify the functions of the emerging products.

Biography:

Dr.S.P.Malarkannan has been Graduated in Veterinary Science from Tamilnadu Veterinary and Animal Sciences University with the specialties including Animal Science and Dairy Science from Veterinary College and Research Institute, Namakkal, Tamilnadu, India. Later on he obtained his post-graduation from University of Kerala Agricultural University, Vellanikara, Trichur with subjects Dairy Science and then started working his career as Veterinary Surgeon at The MILMA, Kerala and then as Assistant Professor in Arul Anandar College, Karumathur, Madurai, Tamilnadu, India where he has continued his research. Presently he has been working at the Arul Anandar College, Karumathur, Madurai City.

Abstract:

Ice cream is a high-calorie product added with artificial sweetener or sugar and is not suitable for diabetic people. At present, low-calorie dietetic foods, the products made with alternative sweeteners become popular. In the present study, the ice cream was developed with the natural sweetener palm sugar at the rate of 33.33, 66.66 and 100 percent. The pH of the samples was ranged from 6.3 to 7.5 and showed a significant change. Titratable Acidity (as percentage lactic acid) of ice cream samples were 00.18, 0.14, 0.11 and 0.07 and had a significant change due to the presence of weak acid-forming minerals in palm sugar. The  total  solids,  moisture  and  fat  content  of  the  samples  were  ranged  from  36.05  to  36.18, 61.59 to 66.04 and 10.1 to 10.60 per cent respectively and exhibited no significant difference. The increase in mineral content of the samples as the replacement level of palm sugar increased results in an increasing trend in ash percentage and a decreasing trend in the overrun percentage and melting rate of the product. The energy value (cal/g) of dietetic ice cream samples were ranged from 2305.564 to 3316.248 and showed a significant difference (P<0.01). The index of viscosity (g. sec) were ranged from -14.21 to -16.57 per cent and showed a significant difference (P< 0.01). The standard plate count and coliform count of the samples were within the permissible level. The organoleptic quality revealed a 100 per cent replacement (T3) of cane sugar with palm sugar scored a better result than control. Due to  the progressive increase in the palm sugar levels in the samples had a similar increase in the cost of ice cream samples. The increase in the cost of samples could be attributed to the higher cost of palm sugar as compared to cane sugar.

Biography:

Marcello Menapace is a researcher, philosopher, scientist, medical writer, and professional regulatory consultant. He has completed his first Master’s degree at the University of Milan (IT) in Chemistry, his second Master’s degree in Business Administration (MBA) at the London School of Business and Finance in London (UK) and his PhD in Life Science at the H. S. University in Philadelphia (US). He has published several scientific papers on Science, Ethics and Nutrition, has been honorable speaker, chair and co-chair in European and International Conferences and is currently collaborating with Biotech Companies and Journals as Reviewer and Co-Editor.

Abstract:

Recent advances in glycobiology have described the inner workings of the much debated blood type diets (BTD). The confirmed presence of special sugars (glycans) in all foods explain how and why people of different blood type react differently to food. All women and men can be effectively divided into four blood groups: A, B, AB and O. The BTD has been devised empirically but can now be demonstrated theoretically, too. This characterization of humanity into distinct groups (or constitutions) is neither unique nor a recent discovery. Traditionally, all medicines have always helped humanity overcome diseases with its own special interventions based on a particular constitution of the individual: most of which focused on adjusting ones diet. It can be claimed that all non-Western (Eastern) medicines (from Unani, to traditional Chinese medicine, Ayurveda, etc) and Western medicines of the past (especially, traditional Western medicine) acted in this way. While the number of somatotypes may according to tradition, the fundamental concepts remain the same. A new paradigm has emerged of late which have futher confirmed the already strong scientific backing to these medicines and traditions: the holobiont. Through the biological underpinnings of the microbiota-host interactions it is possible to attain a synthesis between the two biotypologies, which are not mutually exclusive. In this way, each individual can be described as a function of its genetic and physical characteristics. The result is a new nutritional system, which takes into account both the well-tested traditional suggestions (seasonal foods, etc) and the contemporary biological medicine.

Biography:

Dr. Martina Bluhm studied biochemistry at the University of Tübingen prior to earning her PhD at the University of Leipzig. Her research was dedicated to the field of antimicrobial peptides and other proteinaceous biomaterials. Inspired by the opportunities in Industrial Biotechnology she joined c-LEcta in 2016 as Business Development Manager.

Abstract:

Evolution has blessed us with a sense of taste allowing the joyful consumption of culinary delights, where especially sweet-tasting food products with high sugar content – indicating “no toxicity” -catch our attraction. However, the resulting widely spread overconsumption of sugar has turned indulgence into serious health concerns for the human population: more and more people are impaired by health issues such as overweight, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Consequently, consumer advisors as well as politicians demand a significant reduction of sugar in processed foods and c-LEcta as leading biotechnology company dedicated to the development of enzyme cascades and cell-free biosynthesis approaches this issue with innovative ideas:

We have created proven concepts for the enzymatic in-situ conversion of critical sugars like fructose, glucose and saccharose into more valuable saccharides while – most importantly - maintaining taste and texture. By such treatment, foodstuff with added benefits including less sugar, lower calorie count and reduced glycemic index can be produced. The methods are especially applicable for raw materials with a naturally high content of sugar like fruit juices and thereby are not only an alternative to high intensity sweeteners but offer a solution for a so far hardly addressable technical challenge.

Nassar MF

Children`s Hospital, Faculty of Medicine Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt

Title: E-BABE- Defying Secular Trend
Biography:

University professor, clinician and researcher in the field of Pediatric nutrition with 30 years of exceptional record, experience and contributions in teaching nutrition knowledge and skills to medical students and applying such expertise for the welfare of patients.

 

A member of many international Pediatric and Nutrition societies and pronounced reviewer in several distinguished journals. Supervisor of over 100 Pediatrics Master and MD Theses in the faculty of Medicine Ain Shams University with numerous publications in the field of Pediatric Clinical Nutrition.

Valuable efforts in the establishment of the Clinical Nutrition clinic in the Children`s Hospital, Faculty of Medicine Ain Shams University and Al-Adan Hospital, MOH, Kuwait.

Abstract:

The secular variation of biological anthropology tends to assess the degree of socio-economic development that is why nations try hard to achieve better secular trends of growth.

Taller height has been often described as a sign of social status and privilege, therefore it became a personal as well as a society wish. Generally, in the last decades, stature tends to stabilize; however, weight continues to grow causing overweight to take pandemic forms. Nutrition and genetics are the main determinants of height trends and since maximum genetic potential can be restrained; nutrition takes the lead.

Growth acceleration, during pursuit of positive height trend, correlates with long-term health problems in humans. most studies show a positive association between rapid growth (height, weight, or both) and increased overweight and obesity, regardless of age. Therefore, the ultimate goal is to defy the secular trend and achieve a better height potential without the health burdens of excess weight.

Protein quality rather than quantity is what truly makes a difference in height. Although nutrition in most countries can be raised by rational dietary guidelines, the deterioration of the protein index, even in the wealthiest nations, is alarming. 

Thus the myth is giving up on height and believing in the exhaustion of the genetic potential theory. The truth, on the other hand, is that there is still hope lying in our right choice of protein. Current threats to protein quality can explain the observed negative height trends. These threats can result from a combination of the inadequate “fast-food” nutrition and some misleading dietary guidelines.

In conclusion, adherence to the classic food pyramid for the required protein quantity and paying attention to the protein index would pave the way for dream realization regarding positive height trends. 

Topwe Milongwe MWENE-MBEJA

Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Lubumbashi, Congo (DRC)

Title: Enzymatic reactions in the production of biomethane from organic waste
Biography:

Topwe Milongwe MWENE-MBEJA, Ph. D., Organic chemistry, University of Laval, Quebec, Canada. His a professor of organic chemistry at the Department of chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Lubumbashi, DR Congo. Research interest: Organic chemistry: Our group is interested in the discovery of pharmaceutical organic naturally occurring products possessing properties against cancer. Our group is also interested in green chemistry projects related to the prevention of pollution of the environment and sustainable development.

Abstract:

Enzymatic reactions refer to organic reactions catalyzed by enzymes. This review aims to enrich the documentation relative to enzymatic reactions occurring during the anaerobic degradation of residual organic substances with emphasis on the structures of organic compounds and reaction mechanisms. This allows to understand the displacement of the electron between electron-rich and electron-poor entities to form new bonds in products. The detailed mechanisms of enzymatic reactions relative to the production of biomethane have not yet been reviewed in the scientific literature. Hence, this review is novel and timely as it discusses the chemical behavior or the reactivity of different functional groups, thereby allowing to better understand the enzymatic catalysis in the transformations of residual proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids into biomethane and fertilizers. Such understanding allows to improve the overall biomethanation efficiency in industrial applications.

Hassan Raza

The Islamia University of Bahawalpur, Pakistan

Title: Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Activity of Fruit Juices
Biography:

Hassan raza has completed his BSc (Hons) Agriculture (Food Science and Technology) at the age of 21 years from The Islamia University of Bahawalpur, Pakistan. He has 2 Publication in reputed journals.

Abstract:

The research looks into the beneficial properties of fruits and their juices in terms of their role in preventing harmful substances from organisms. The key properties that are investigated in this research are antioxidant and microbial properties of fruit juices that are important in healthcare and food sciences. There are fruits juices that could either be fresh or artificial in nature. The study explores the effect of fresh juices on humans to study how it prevents cell damage and promotes antioxidant activity. It also investigates the capacity to kill microorganisms in human beings by the intake of fresh fruit juices. Three fruit juices (apple, grapes and pomegranate) are selected for this purpose, their anti microbial activity is analyzed against selected micro organisms, the methodology for the data collection has been laboratory where clinical samples of the juices have been taken. These samples were tested and their antioxidant and antimicrobial properties were investigated. The samples of three fruits were taken including pomegranate, grapes and pomegranate. The results were drawn at the end of the experiment and given properties were explored in their juices. The conclusions given at the end of the research signify the importance of these juices in curing various diseases and promoting resistance within human bodies, more over result proved that apple has high anti microbial activity as compared to grapes and pomegranates.

Biography:

Raffaele Pilla is PharmD, PhD, Doctor Europaeus. He received his Master’s degree in Pharmacy at G. d’Annunzio University in Chieti-Pescara, Italy in 2005, where he also served internships at the Cell Physiology Laboratory and Molecular Biology Laboratory. Prior, he was an Erasmus Student at Faculté de Pharmacie de Reims in Reims, France. He received his Doctor Europaeus in 2010 from Pitié-Salpétrière Institute in Paris, France. Also in 2010, he received his PhD in Biochemistry, Physiology, and Pathology of Muscle at G. d’Annunzio University in Chieti-Pescara, Italy. He was hired as a Postdoctoral Scholar in the Department of Pharmacology and Physiology at the University of South Florida in Tampa, on two research grants funded by the Office of Naval Research (US Navy) and Divers’ Alert Network. He has written and lectured widely worldwide. He has been involved in ongoing research at the University of South Florida with the use of ketone esters.

Abstract:

It has been recently shown that nutritional ketosis is effective against seizure disorders and various acute/chronic neurological disorders. Physiologically, glucose is the primary metabolic fuel for cells. However, many neurodegenerative disorders have been associated with impaired glucose transport/metabolism and with mitochondrial dysfunction, such as Alzheimer’s/Parkinson’s disease, general seizure disorders, and traumatic brain injury. Ketone bodies and tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates represent alternative fuels for the brain and can bypass the rate- limiting steps associated with impaired neuronal glucose metabolism. Therefore, therapeutic ketosis can be considered as a metabolic therapy by providing alternative energy substrates. It has been estimated that the brain derives over 60% of its total energy from ketones when glucose availability is limited. In fact, after prolonged periods of fasting or ketogenic diet (KD), the body utilizes energy obtained from free fatty acids (FFAs) released from adipose tissue. Because the brain is unable to derive significant energy from FFAs, hepatic ketogenesis converts FFAs into ketone bodies-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) and acetoacetate (AcAc)-while a percentage of AcAc spontaneously decarboxylates to acetone. Large quantities of ketone bodies accumulate in the blood through this mechanism. This represents a state of normal physiological ketosis and can be therapeutic. Ketone bodies are transported across the blood-brain barrier by monocarboxylic acid transporters to fuel brain function. Starvation or nutritional ketosis is an essential survival mechanism that ensures metabolic flexibility during prolonged fasting or lack of carbohydrate ingestion. Therapeutic ketosis leads to metabolic adaptations that may improve brain metabolism, restore mitochondrial ATP production, decrease reactive oxygen species production, reduce inflammation, and increase neurotrophic factors’ function. It has been shown that KD mimics the effects of fasting and the lack of glucose/insulin signaling, promoting a metabolic shift towards fatty acid utilization. In this work, the author reports a number of successful case reports treated through metabolic ketosis.