Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 4th International Conference and Exhibition on Nutrition Chicago, Illinois, USA.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Ozlem Tokusoglu

Celal Bayar University, Turkey

Keynote: Innovation technologies on nutritional quality and health

Time : 09:00-09:35

Conference Series Nutrition 2015 International Conference Keynote Speaker Ozlem Tokusoglu photo
Biography:

Tokusoglu has completed her PhD at Ege University Engineering Faculty, Dept. of Food Engineering at 2001. She is currently working as Associate Professor faculty member in Celal Bayar University Engineering Faculty Department of Food Engineering. She performed a visiting scholarship at the Food Science and Nutrition Department /University of Florida, Gainesville-Florida-USA during 1999-2000 and as Visiting Professor at the School of Food Science, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington,USA during April-May 2010. She has published many papers in peer reviewed journals and serving as an Editorial Board Member of International Journal of Food Science and Technology (IJFST) by Wiley Publisher, USA and Journal of Food, Agriculture and Environment (JFAE) by WFL Publisher, Finland. She published the scientific edited two book entitled “Fruit and Cereal Bioactives: Chemistry, Sources and Applications” by CRC Press, Taylor & Francis, USA. She is a Publisher for book entitled “Improved Food Quality with Novel Food Processing” by CRC Press, third book “Food By-Product Based Functional Food Powders” is in progress.

Abstract:

The “nutrition” word first appeared in 1551 and comes from the Latin word nutrire, meaning “to nourish.” Currently, it is defined as the sum of all processes involved in how organisms obtain nutrients, metabolize them and use them to support all of life’s processing. Nutritional science covers a wide spectrum of disciplines such as personal health, population health and planetary and health and this nutritional science concern the research and investigation of how an organism is nourished. New trends in food processing and technology affect the nutritional quality and quantity and the product manufacturing quality. Consumers around the world are better educated and more demanding in their identification and purchase of quality health promoting foods. The food industry and regulatory agencies are searching for innovative technologies to provide safe and stable foods for their clientele. Thermal pasteurization and commercial sterilization of foods provide safe and nutritious foods that, unfortunately, are often heated beyond a safety factor that results in unacceptable quality and nutrient retention. Most foods are thermally preserved by subjecting the products to heating temperatures for a few seconds to several minutes and these high-energy generally diminish the cooking flavors, the vitamins, essential nutrients, phenolics and bioactive other constituents in the food products. Non thermal processing facilitates the development of innovative food products not previously envisioned. Niche markets for food products and processes will receive greater attention in future years. Non thermal technologies successfully decontaminate, pasteurize and potentially pursue commercial sterilization of selected foods while retaining fresh-like quality and excellent nutrient retention. The quest for technologies to meet consumer expectations with optimum quality safe processed foods is a most important priority for future food science research. The relevant factors to consider when conducting research into novel non thermal and thermal technologies as: Target microorganisms to provide safety; target enzymes to extend quality shelf life; maximization of potential synergistic effects; alteration of quality attributes; engineering aspects; conservation of energy and water; potential for convenient scale-up of pilot scale processes; reliability and economics of technologies and consumer perception of the technologies. “The search for new approaches to processing foods should be driven, above all, to maximize safety, quality, convenience, costs and consumer wellness”. Non thermal processing includes less heating procedures and especially cold processing techniques such as high pressure processing (HHP), pulsed electrical field (PEF) and ultrasound. Each technique can be utilized either alone or in combination to optimize the product quality. In this speech content, recent research on high pressure processing, pulsed electrical field and ultrasound processed egg and egg products, fruit juices including apple and cranberry juices and some fruits including berries, grape pomace, olive and coconut.

Keynote Forum

Gary Stoner

Medical College of Wisconsin, USA

Keynote: Berries for cancer prevention

Time : 09:35-10:10

Conference Series Nutrition 2015 International Conference Keynote Speaker Gary Stoner photo
Biography:

Dr. Stoner is Professor of Medicine at the Medical College of Wisconsin (MCW) Division of Hematology and Oncology, specializing in the fields of chemical carcinogenesis and cancer chemoprevention. He serves as Director of the Molecular Carcinogenesis and Chemoprevention Program in the newly developing Cancer Center. Dr. Stoner joined MCW after nearly 20 years at the Ohio State University College of Medicine where he held the positions of Lucius Wing Endowed Chair in Cancer Research and Therapy, Associate Director for Basic Research and Director of the Chemoprevention Program in the Cancer Center, and Chair of the Division of Environmental Health Sciences and Associate Dean for Research in the College of Public Health.

Abstract:

A considerable amount of research has been conducted in the past two decades to evaluate the cancer preventative potential of berries. Most studies have utilized black raspberries, however, other berry types such as strawberries, blackberries, blueberries, red raspberries, acai and others are also capable of preventing cancer. Initially, a series of berry extracts were shown to reduce the proliferation rate of cancer cells in vitro and/or to stimulate apoptosis. The inhibitory potential of these extracts was often attributed to their content of ellagitannins or anthocyanins. Preclinical studies demonstrated that freeze-dried berry powders were effective in preventing chemical carcinogen-induced cancer in the rodent oral cavity, esophagus, and colon, and an anthocyanin-rich extract inhibited UV-induced skin cancer in mice. Mechanistic studies showed that the berries prevented the conversion of premalignant lesions in rodent tissues to malignancy by reducing cell proliferation, inflammation, and angiogenesis and by stimulating apoptosis and cell differentiation. Multiple genes associated with all of these cellular functions are protectively modulated by berries. For example, berries down-regulate the expression levels of genes in the P13K/Akt, MAPK, ERK ½, AP-1 and mTOR signaling pathways (proliferation), COX-2, iNOS, NF-κB, IL-1β and IL-12 (inflammation), VEGF and HIF-1α (angiogenesis), and upregulate caspase 3/7 and Bax (apoptosis), and both keratin- and mucus-associated genes for squamous and glandular differentiation, respectively. Bio-fractionation studies indicate that the most active inhibitory compounds in berries are the anthocyanins and ellagitannins. The fiber fraction of berries is also effective in preventing cancer in rodents and research is needed to identify the active polysaccharides in this fraction.rnHuman clinical trials indicate that freeze-dried berry formulations elicit little or no toxicity in humans when administered in the diet at concentrations as high as 60g/day for as long as nine months. The uptake of berry anthocyanins and ellagic acid into blood is rapid but minimal; i.e., less than 1% of the administered dose. Nearly 70% of the administered anthocyanins are metabolized by the enteric bacteria into protocatechuic acid (PCA) which has substantial cancer preventative activity. Black raspberry formulations have been shown to cause histologic regression of oral leukoplakic lesions in the oral cavity, dysplastic lesions in the esophagus, and polyps in the rectum of patients with familial adenomatous polyposis. These results are very promising and the mechanisms for these effects will be discussed. In addition, the advantages and challenges to the clinical application of utilizing berries for cancer prevention will be discussed and suggestions made for future trials.

Keynote Forum

Alison Burton Shepherd

De Montfort University, UK

Keynote: Preventing malnutrition in home dwelling elderly individuals

Time : 10:10-10:45

Conference Series Nutrition 2015 International Conference Keynote Speaker Alison Burton Shepherd photo
Biography:

Alison Burton Shepherd is a Senior Lecturer in Adult Nursing at De Montfort University, UK. In 2010, she became a Queens Nurse, which is an Award given for excellence in Nursing Care within the community setting. She works as an Advanced Nurse Practitioner and she is an Independent Nurse Prescriber. She is also an Inspector for the Care Quality Commission.

Abstract:

Undernutrition is common among older people generally and arguably malnutrition is considered to be a larger public health problem than that of obesity. At any point in time it estimated more than 3 million individuals in United Kingdom are at risk of developing malnutrition with approximately 93% of those living in their own homes. Latest data from the USA (Gerontological Society of America 2015) also asserts that one third to half of all US adults in the community setting aged 65 years and over are malnourished or are at risk of malnutrition upon admission to hospital. Malnutrition is associated with both increased morbidity and mortality. Therefore it is prudent to suggest that prevention is better than cure. This presentation will begin by examining some of the causes of malnutrition in the elderly. The remainder of the session provides an in depth focused discussion on the role of healthcare clinicians in its assessment and prevention and recommends ways in which clinical practice may be improved.

Break: Networking & Refreshments 10:45-11:05 @ Foyer
Conference Series Nutrition 2015 International Conference Keynote Speaker Li-Shu Wang photo
Biography:

Li-Shu Wang is an Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Division of Hematology and Oncology at the Medical College of Wisconsin (MCW). Her research interests are in the fields of chemical carcinogenesis and cancer chemoprevention. She received her PhD in Veterinary Biosciences from Ohio State University where her research was focused on illustrating the mechanisms of conjugated linoleic acid, naturally occurring compounds, in the prevention of breast cancers. Afterward, she continued involved in cancer prevention research as a Post-doctoral fellow and research scientist at the same university. During her Post-doctoral training, her research was focused on the prevention of gastrointestinal cancers using berries, their active components and metabolites. Her research is documented in more than 45 peer-reviewed publications and book chapters. She has received numerous awards including scholar-in-training award of American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) prevention meeting and IAMS research funds. She is a reviewer for several publications including but not limited to Cancer Research, Clinical Cancer Research, Cancer Epidemiology and Biomarkers & Prevention.

Abstract:

Although with improved understanding of the pathophysiology of pancreatic ductal adeno-carcinoma (PDAC) in the past two decades, PDAC remains one of the poorest prognostic tumors, with an extremely low 5-year survival rate (4.1%). Diets rich in fruits and vegetables have been reported to reduce the risk of cancer development. Our current study investigated the potential effects of BRBs against PDAC in mice. KrasLSL.G12D/+-Trp53LSL.R172H/+-Pdx-1-Cre mice spontaneously develop PDAC that recapitulates human PDAC. Four-week-old KrasLSL.G12D/+-Trp53LSL.R172H/+-Pdx-1-Cre mice bearing precancerous pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) lesions were fed either control or 5% BRB diet. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that BRBs significantly prolonged survival of PDAC mice. BRBs suppressed Raf/MEK/ERK/STAT3 pathways, downstream of Kras and inhibited cell proliferation in pancreatic tumors. In addition, BRBs significantly decreased the size of tumors produced by injecting luciferase-transfected human Panc-1 cells (Panc-1-Luc) into the pancreas of NOD.SCID mice. Orthotopic tumors in BRB-treated NOD.SCID mice had higher rate of apoptosis compared to tumors from mice fed control diet. These results support the hypothesis of a clinical potential of BRBs for the delay of pancreatic cancer progression through suppressing cancer cell proliferation and/or promoting apoptosis.

Conference Series Nutrition 2015 International Conference Keynote Speaker Talha Muezzinoglu photo
Biography:

Talha Müezzinoglu (Professor) is the Head of the Urology Department of Medical Faculty of Celal Bayar University. He completed his Bachelor’s (1991) science at Medical Faculty of Dokuz Eylul University, Izmir. He is currently working as full Professor in the Department of Urology of the Medical Faculty of Celal Bayar University as a faculty member from 2011 to date. He professionally officiated at Heildelberg University, Heillbronn Hospital, Germany, as a Research Associate at 2007 and also professionally officiated at Emory University, Atlanta, USA as a tranie scholar for robotic urological surgery. He organized various international attendee congress. His research interests range from prostate incidence and advanced uro-oncology techniques to life quality in urological cancers, cancer treatment methodologies. He has administrated and attended to several laparoscopy prostatectomy and laparascopic urology courses, clinical trials, research education programs in national and international countries. He served as health publisher and media partner for national newspapers for raising the awareness of public.

Abstract:

In this study, the concentrations of different trace metals, including Fe, Mg, Cd, Ni, Zn, Cu, Se, Ca and Boron (B) in malign and benign prostate tissues, were determined by Induced Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectroscopy and Induced Coupled Plasma-Optic Emission Spectroscopy. We also analyzed the relationship of these concentrations with histopathology stage, PSA and clinical survey. It was investigated the possible role of tissue trace element levels in development of prostate cancer and the relationship between histopathologic stage, preoperative PSA levels and biochemical PSA recurrences. Cd, Ni and Ca average concentrations were determined lower and Fe average concentration was determined higher in prostate cancer tissue, statistically (55.64 µg/kg, p=0.033; 784.02 µg/kg, p<0.001; 656.94 mg/kg, p<0.001 and 56.52 mg/kg, p=0.039, respectively). There was a negative correlation between B and total gleason score (p=0.003) and positive correlation between Se and total gleason score (p=0.002). Mg and Ca were determined higher and B was detected lower in tissues with neuro-vascular invasion (p=0.016, p=0.008 and p=0.033, respectively). Only Zn concentration was lower in cases with extra capsular extention then without (p=0.016). There was no any relationship or correlation between the concentration of trace elements and preoperative PSA levels, biochemical PSA recurrences, surgical margins and invasion of seminal vesicles. The increasing in Fe levels and decreasing in Cd, Ni, Ca, and theirs heterogeneous distribution in malign samples was very important for the investigation of cancer mechanisms. Besides, some of trace elements may effect of the prognosis of prostate cancer. In this context, more studies are needed regarding the increasing or decreasing in the trace element concentrations in malign prostate samples.

  • Track 1 Nutritional Disorders and Nutritional Treatments
    Track 2 Nutrition and Cancer- Clinical Studies

Session Introduction

Firew Lemma Berjia

National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, The Netherlands

Title: Finding the optimum scenario in risk-benefit assessment: An example on vitamin D
Biography:

Firew Lemma Berjia has completed his PhD from the National Food Institute, Technical University of Denmark. He has published 4 papers in reputed journals including his MSc thesis and he is now looking for a new scientific challenge.

Abstract:

In risk-benefit assessment of food and nutrients, several studies so far have focused on comparison of two scenarios to weigh the health effect against each other. One obvious next step is finding the optimum scenario that provides maximum net health gains. This paper aims to show a method for finding the optimum scenario that provides maximum net health gains; a multiple scenario simulation. The method is presented using vitamin D intake in Denmark as an example. In addition to the reference scenario, several alternative scenarios are simulated to detect the scenario that provides maximum net health gains. As a common health metric, Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALY) has been used to project the net health effect by using the QALIBRA (Quality of Life for Benefit Risk Assessment) software. The method used in the vitamin D example shows that it is feasible to find an optimum scenario that provides maximum net health gain in health risk-benefit assessment of dietary exposure as expressed by serum vitamin D level. With regard to the vitamin D assessment, a considerable health gain is observed due to the reduction of risk of other cause mortality, fall and hip fractures when changing from the reference to the optimum scenario. The method allowed us to find the optimum serum level in the vitamin D example. Additional case studies are needed to further validate the applicability of the approach to other nutrients or foods especially with regards to the uncertainty that is usually attending the data.

Judith Lukaszuk

Northern Illinois University, USA

Title: Overweight status and its effect on Serum 25 (OH) D levels

Time : 12:15- 12:40

Speaker
Biography:

Judith M Lukaszuk has completed her MS and PhD at the University of Pittsburgh. She is a registered and licensed Dietitian and Nutritionist. She works at Northern Illinois University as a Nutrition Professor and is the Didactic Program Director. She has published in the area of sports nutrition and integrative nutrition.

Abstract:

Excess adipose tissue may lead to sequestrating of vitamin D making it less available for use in the body. This study was conducted to determine if overweight individuals (BMI>25) have insufficient (<30 ng/mL) levels of 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25-OH D) and if so would serum levels respond to exogenous supplementation. Sixty-four overweight (BMI 31.11±5.01) women were randomly assigned in a double blind manner to receive either 5000 IU of vitamin D3 (D3) (n=31) or a maltodextrin placebo (PL) (n=33). Serum 25 (OH) D concentrations were measured by finger stick analyses at baseline and after an eight-week supplementation period. The results of this study show that on day one of the study both D3 and PL group had insufficient levels of vitamin D (mean±SD) 24.03±9.78 ng/mL and 22.48±9.69 ng/mL respectively. After eight weeks of supplementation the D3 group 25 (OH) D level rose to a mean of ⱡ 43.57±10.87ng/mL (ⱡ p<0.001) versus the PL group whose 25 (OH) D level remained statistically unchanged 24.30±8.96 ng/mL. Overweight women had insufficient vitamin D levels prior to supplementation. Following supplementation with 5000 IU of vitamin D3 all subjects’ 25 (OH) D levels rose to a sufficient level (≥30 ng/mL). This suggests that women who are overweight or obese may need a vitamin D dosage which slightly exceeds the Institute of Medicines recommendation of 4000 IU per day and that supplementation may improve serum levels.

Joan Cook-Mills

Northwestern University School of Medicine, USA

Title: Vitamin E isoforms regulate allergic disease

Time : 12:40-13:05

Speaker
Biography:

Joan Cook-Mills completed her PhD at Michigan State University and postdoctoral studies at the University of Illinois at Chicago. She was an Assistant Professor at the University of Cincinnati and then Associate Professor at Northwestern University. She is a now a Professor in the Allergy/Immunology Division at Northwestern University in Chicago. She has published more than 50 papers in scientific journals and has served on study sections for the National Institutes for Health and the American Heart Association. Her research on vitamin E was in a press release from Northwestern University and then presented in the New York Times and other Biography Joan Cook-Mills completed her PhD at Michigan State University and postdoctoral studies at the University of Illinois at Chicago. She was an Assistant Professor at the University of Cincinnati and then Associate Professor at Northwestern University. She is a now a Professor in the Allergy/Immunology Division at Northwestern University in Chicago. She has published more than 50 papers in scientific journals and has served on study sections for the National Institutes for Health and the American Heart Association. Her research on vitamin E was in a press release from Northwestern University and then presented in the New York Times and other magazines.

Abstract:

Asthma is a heterogeneous disease resulting from complex interactions of environmental and genetic factors. The World Health Organization reported that the prevalence of asthma has increased over only a few decades suggesting an important role of the local environment. One environmental change over the past 40 years has been an increase in the d-γ-tocopherol isoform of vitamin E in the diet and in infant formulas. Our studies focus on regulation of allergic inflammation by the two most abundant forms of vitamin E (d-α-tocopherol and d-γ-tocopherol) in the diet and tissues. We demonstrated that α-tocopherol inhibits and γ-tocopherol elevates leukocyte recruitment across endothelium in vitro and endothelial cell protein kinase Cα activation for eosinophil and dendritic cell recruitment during allergic inflammation. Specifically, γ-tocopherol is an agonist and α-tocopherol is an antagonist of PKC . In vivo, α-tocopherol supplementation blocks eosinophilic allergic lung responses in adult mice and that α-tocopherol associates with better lung spirometry in adult humans. Notably, γ-tocopherol has the opposite function. In humans, a 5-fold higher plasma γ-tocopherol level associates with lower lung spirometry in adults by age 21, suggesting tocopherol isoforms have a regulatory role early in life. In clinical studies and animal models, offspring of allergic mothers have increased responsiveness to allergen challenge. We demonstrated that development of allergic responses in offspring is inhibited or elevated by maternal supplementation with α-tocopherol or γ- tocopherol, respectively. These results have implications for supplementation of allergic mothers with tocopherol isoforms and for development of allergies in future generations. Grant Support: NIH R01HL111624.

Break: Lunch Break 13:05-13:55 @ Athens
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Agens received his MD degree in 1986 from Rutgers Medical School, completed an internal medicine residency at Cooper Hospital University Medical Center, Camden, NJ in 1989. He is board certified in Internal Medicine and Geriatrics through the American Board of Internal Medicine. Prior to coming to Florida State University College of Medicine as Associate Professor in Geriatrics in 2008, Dr. Agens started and operated a solo internal medicine practice in his hometown of Blackwood, N.J 1989-1993. After moving to Eau Claire, Wisconsin, he served for 10 years as a geriatrician at Midelfort Clinic-Mayo Health System., 1991-2003. Throughout his career, Dr. Agens has taught and mentored medical students and residents as a clinical preceptor. In 2003, Dr. Agens moved to Tallahassee, Florida. He spent over five years as director of the Center for Chronic Care at Capital Health Plan, which delivered intensive primary care to some of its most complex patients and improved their functional and clinical outcomes. It was during this time he noted most of those patients were vitamin D deficient. He became acutely interested helping patients function better addressing their nutritional status as one component. During that time he served as Clinical Assistant Professor and as community faculty for multiple clinical rotations at Florida State University College of Medicine. Since 2008, Dr. Agens served as the Geriatrics Clerkship Director for fourth year medical students at the Tallahassee Regional Campus and since 2011 sees older patients in the Florida Medical Practice Plan. Still interested in vitamin D , he published with Gail Galasko, Ph. D. “Awareness of vitamin D deficiency states and recommended supplementation doses: Survey of faculty and staff at a medical school” in “e-SPEN Journal” suggesting an overall low awareness of the relationship between low vitamin D status and poor physical function/ falls.

Abstract:

Background: On November 30, 2010, new Dietary Reference Intake recommendations for vitamin D were published by the Institute of Medicine. The Recommended Daily Allowance was revised upward to 800 IU/day for adults 71 and older. At that time we reported in e-SPEN low self-reported vitamin D levels as prevalent in our survey sample of physician (MD) medical school faculty living in an area of the USA with plentiful sunshine. MD’s who had their own vitamin D level checked were 4.5 times more likely to recommend greater than or equal to 800 IU/day for their patients as compared to those who reported not having had their own levels checked. Awareness of conditions associated with vitamin D deficiency other than osteoporosis, rickets and osteomalacia was relatively low. One specific example is falls in older persons where vitamin D is recommended as part of a multi factorial fall-risk assessment and prevention strategy, the CDC STEADI protocol. Our fourth year medical students taking a required geriatrics clerkship perform functional assessment and a comprehensive medication review (including non-prescription medications) under the supervision of our faculty and write separate reports on each. After graduation consenting students have the opportunity to have their written reports studied in research approved by the IRB of Florida State University.
Research Question: We hypothesized that the proportion of patients noted as receiving 800 IU/day or more of supplemental vitamin D as noted in students’ written assignments would be low (less than 50%) where patients are functionally impaired and at risk for falls given overall low awareness in faculty of falls being a risk associated with vitamin D deficiency.
Subjects & Methods: Twenty two consenting students had their comprehensive medication review assignments reviewed representing 20 percent of all students taking the required geriatrics course at 6 regional campuses over one academic year. Each assignment represented one patient ages ranging from 55-97, mean age was 81 years. Prescription and non-prescription medications were reviewed and verified as required in the assignment.
Results: Four patients (18%) were on vitamin D: Calcitriol 0.25 mg daily, vitamin D 50,000 International IU once weekly (a known vitamin D deficient patient), vitamin D 200 IU once daily and vitamin D 800 IU daily. In one case a student recommended that the patient not on a vitamin D supplement recommended vitamin D 800 IU daily to prevent falls.
Conclusion: In this cohort of 4th year medical students and their geriatric patients at high risk for falls, use of vitamin D was low and recommendation for use to prevent falls was low.

Francois Blachier

National Institute of Agronomic Research, France

Title: Hyperproteic diet, intestinal microbiota, and colonic epithelium: The dangerous relationships

Time : 14:20-14:45

Speaker
Biography:

Francois Blachier got his PhD in 1988 from the University Pierre and Marie Curie in Paris, France. He is research director at the National Institute of Agronomic Research (INRA) since 2000. He published over 100 papers which have been cited over 2300 times (Web of Science). He is academic editor for PLOS ONE and field editor of Amino Acids.

Abstract:

The protein consumption in countries like USA and France is largely above the recommended dietary intake, and can represent more than 4 times this value in slimming hyperproteic (HP) diet. This results in increased transfer of undigested protein from the small to the large intestine. We have shown in the rat model that HP diet ingestion results in marked changes of the luminal environment of the colonic epithelial cells with modifications of the microbiota composition and its metabolic capacity. HP animals had increased colonic water content and amino acid-derived bacterial metabolites like ammonia, branched-chain fatty acids, ethanol, organic acids, hydrogen sulfide etc. Several of those latter (ammonia, hydrogen sulfide and p-cresol) are inhibitor of colonocyte respiration when present in excess. In addition, p-cresol acts as a genotoxic compound on colonocytes. Our recent results show that HP diet consumption modifies the morphology of colonocytes and the distribution of mucous cells in the colonic crypts. Lastly, by using a transcriptomic approach, we noticed that the HP diet modifies in colonocytes the expression of genes related to several cellular functions including apoptosis, cellular architecture, adhesion, immunity and DNA-damage-related events. Our as part of an European research project consortium, has undertaken a study on the effects of 3 weeks-HP diet ingestion in overweight volunteers.

Piwen Wang

Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science, USA

Title: Enhanced chemopreventive effect by combining Quercetin and green tea in prostate cancer

Time : 14:45-15:10

Speaker
Biography:

Piwen Wang received his MD degree in 2000 and MS degree in 2003 from Shandong Medical University, China. He has completed his PhD degree in 2008 from Texas Tech University, and postdoctoral studies at the UCLA Center for Human Nutrition. He is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Cancer Research and Training at Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science. He has published more than 20 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as a peer reviewer for a number of scientific journals.

Abstract:

The chemopreventive activity of green tea (GT) in prostate cancer has been well demonstrated in preclinical cell culture and animal models. However, results from human studies are inconsistent. The low bioavailability and extensive metabolism of GT polyphenols (GTPs) in vivo limit the anti-cancer activity of GT. We found in human prostate tissues and in mouse xenograft prostate tumor tissues that around 50% of GTPs were in methylated form after GT consumption, and the methylation decreased the anti-cancer activity of GTPs. We were able to demonstrate that the combination of a natural methylation inhibitor quercetin (Q) with GT increased the cellular concentrations of GTPs 4-10 fold in prostate cancer LNCaP and PC-3 cells and decreased the methylation of GTPs. The combination treatment enhanced the inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis in both cell lines. Then we performed an animal study to confirm the combined effect of GT and Q in vivo. Severe combined immune deficient (SCID) mice were implanted with androgen-sensitive LAPC-4 prostate cancer cells, and treated with GT, Q, GT+Q or control. After 6-weeks intervention the tumor growth was inhibited by 16% (Q), 21% (GT), and 45% (GT+Q) compared to control. The tissue concentrations of non-methylated GTPs were significantly increased in the combination group. The combination enhanced the inhibition of protein expression of androgen receptor, prostate-specific antigen, and vascular endothelial growth factor. This study provides a novel regimen by combining GT and Q to enhance the chemoprevention of prostate cancer in a non-toxic manner.

Speaker
Biography:

Amanda Swart is an associate professor of Biochemistry at the University of Stellenbosch where she obtained her PhD degree in 1999. As academic she teaches undergraduate and postgraduate courses in the department of Biochemistry and is the co-leader of the P450 Steroid Research group studying steroid hormone biosynthesis and metabolism in the adrenal and prostate gland. In her group she also investigates the bioactivity of natural plant products. She has published more than 40 papers in ISI journals and serves as an editorial board member of Scientific Reports. She is a director of Sissyphus Scientific Solutions, consulting with industry.

Abstract:

Rooibos (Aspalathus linearis), also known as Redbush, is a South African herbal tea rich in polyphenols. Consumption is reported to modulate the immune system, enhance well-being, and to aid anxiety and stress. Stress activates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis resulting in elevated glucocorticoid plasma levels. Glucocorticoids, cortisol and corticosterone, are responsible for maintaining homeostasis of the central nervous system, metabolism and immune function. Long-term exposure to elevated cortisol is associated with symptoms linked to metabolic diseases — metabolic syndrome, diabetes, insulin resistance, depression, and impairment of the immune system, amongst others, many of which result from a hormonal imbalance. We investigated the influence of Rooibos on steroid hormone production in forskolin- stimulated H295R cells, mimicking the stress response in a human adrenal cell model. An in vivo study conducted in male Wistar rats subjected to acute immobilization stress determined the effect of Rooibos on circulating steroid levels. The inhibitory effect of Rooibos on glucocorticoid biosynthesis and on the inactivation of cortisol, as well as on cytokine production was determined. Data showed that Rooibos inhibited glucocorticoid production while also favoring inactivation of glucocorticoids, lowering glucocorticoid plasma levels. Rooibos increased the secretion of IL10, an anti-inflammatory cytokine, while inhibiting IL6, a pro-inflammatory cytokine, in rat adrenal tissue. In H295R cells Rooibos modulated basal and forskolin-stimuated steroid production in the presence of these cytokines. These data suggest that Rooibos may serve as a functional food acting as a protective agent in clinical conditions associated with metabolic diseases.

Break: Networking & Refreshments 15:35-15:55 @ Foyer

Ozlem Tokusoglu

Celal Bayar University, Turkey

Title: Phytochemical phenolics in fruits and cereals and cancer

Time : 15:55-16:20

Speaker
Biography:

Ozlem Tokuşoğlu is an Associate Professor and completed her PhD from Ege University in the Department of Food Engineering, Izmir, Turkey. She professionally worked at the Ege University Department of Chemistry and Food Engineering. She is currently also working as Associate Professor, faculty member in Department of Food Engineering of Celal Bayar University. Her study focuses on nutrition, food quality control, food chemistry, food safety, toxicology, shelf-life of foods and innovative food processing technologies and functional products. Her specific study areas are phenolics, phyto-chemicals, bioactive anti-oxidatives and anti-carcinogens components and food toxicants. She has conducted academic research studies, keynote addresses and academic presentations at many countries and meetings. She has published more than 150 studies in journals and conferences and is a Book Editor of CRC Press Taylor and Francis and has three scientific books. She has been serving as an Editorial Board Member and Associate Editor, section editor of scientific journals. She administrated many international conferences in USA and Europe. She has also been working at OMICS Food Technology Conferences as Organizing Committee Member and is also Chair of the OMICS Food Technology conference series.

Abstract:

The epidemiological researches and also cohort studies have put forwarded that diet rich in fruits and vegetables have preventive effects on prostate cancer (P-Ca) for over the past decades. Phenolic compounds, ubiquitous in fruits, vegetables and plants, are of considerable interest and have received great attention in recently owing to their bioactive functions. Poly-phenols are amongst the most desirable phyto-chemicals due to their antioxidant activity and those components are known as secondary plant metabolites and possess also antimicrobial, antiviral and anti-inflammatory and anti-carcinogen properties along with their high antioxidant capacity. Plant phenolics, such as flavonoids, phenolic acids lignans and stilbenoids, modulate several important biological processes in mammalian cells and show anti-carcinogenic properties in preclinical. Prostate cancer (P-Ca) is one of the most common cancers in men. The incidence of clinical prostate cancer varies widely between ethnic populations and countries in all over the world. Bladder cancer is any of several types of cancer arising from the epithelial lining (i.e., the urothelium) of the urinary bladder. Rarely the bladder is involved by non-epithelial cancers, such as lymphoma or sarcoma but these are not ordinarily included in the colloquial term "bladder cancer. Colorectal cancer (colon cancer or bowel cancer) is the development of cancer in the colon or in the parts of the large intestine (rectum).A diet high in red /processed meat while low in fiber increases the risk of colorectal cancer. The studies regarding phyto-chemical compounds on P-Ca and bladder tumor models are limited. In vivo inhibition of growth of human prostate tumor lines (DU145)by flavonoid fractions from cranberry extract, anti-proliferative effects oleuropein and hydroxyl tryrosol in olive fruit on prostate cell lines (PC-3, DU145) anti-cancer properties of phenolic extracts from different parts of selected Medicinal Plants Indigenous to Malaysia (Casearia capitellata, Baccaurea motleyana, Phyllanthus pulcher and Strobilanthus crispus) on prostate cancer cell lines (DU-145), apoptotic effects of cooked and in vitro digested soy isoflavons (aglycon type daidzein, genistein, glisitein, glycoside type genistin, daidzin, glisitin and acetyl glycoside type) on human prostate cancer cells (LNCaP ve C4-2B) [7], anti-oxidative and anti-proliferative activity on human prostate cancer cells lines (DU145 ve LNCaP) of the phenolic flavonoids (gallotannins and ellagitannins) from Corylopsis coreana uyeki, the apoptosis effects of extracts from Poland Epilobium sp.herbs (Epilobium angustifolium L., E. parviflorum Schreb., E. hirsutum L.) on human hormone-dependent LNCaPprostate cancer cells by activating the mitochondrial pathway, the radical scavenging capacities of rutin, narirutin, poncirin, apigenin 8-C-rutinoside and 3’,5’,di-C-β-glucopyranosyl phloretin of citrus Fortunella margarita from USA and their inhibition of human prostate (LNCaP)cell proliferation and cytotoxic activities. The effects of ursolic acid and its ester phenolics from USA cranberries and Vaccinium fruits on matrix metalloproteinase activity in DU145 prostate tumor cells and colon cancer tumor cells (Caco-2) may be given as limited examples. The further clinical studies are needed regarding food and plant bio-active phenolic compounds on prostate, bladder and colon cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis.

Speaker
Biography:

Mr. Selekane Ananias Motadi is a junior lecturer of Nutrition at the University of Venda. He received his junior degree BSc in Nutrition at the University of Venda. In 2010, He registered for Master Degree in Public Nutrition at the same university. He is a registered Nutritionist with Health Professional Council of South Africa. He was offered tenure in the Department of Nutrition. In addition to teaching, Mr. Motadi is a regular contributor to the micronutrient malnutrition particularly zinc and a Mamelodi sundowns United fan. He has registered for postgraduate diploma in health professional education at the University of Cape Town which he envisages completing in 2015. He has collaborated on manuscripts with Prof XG Mbhenyane, Dr. RL Mamabolo, Ms. HV Mbhatsani and Mr. NS Mabapa entitled “Prevalence of zinc deficiency among children aged 3-5 years in Vhembe district, Limpopo province, South Africa”. He currently resides in Limpopo Province, South Africa with his brother.

Abstract:

Background. Children under five years constitute the most vulnerable group and their nutritional status is a sensitive indicator of community health and nutrition. Diet of many South Africans consists of porridge as staple food which is usually consumed with vegetables, legumes and a small amount of animal derived food. These animal derived food sources are not consumed extensively due to their high cost, limited supply and religious or cultural practices. Objective. To determine the prevalence of zinc and iron deficiency among preschool children aged 3-5 years in Vhembe district, Limpopo province, South Africa. Methods. This study was carried out on 400 preschool children in Vhembe district, Limpopo province, South Africa. Municipalities were purposively selected and subjects were chosen by simple random sampling methods. Anthropometric measurements were made following standard techniques. Serum zinc, iron, ferritin, T saturation, transferrin and CRP levels were measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometery. Results. Of the 400 children, 349 were included in this study. The prevalence of wasting, stunting and underweight was 1.4%, 18.6% and 0.3% respectively while 20.9% of the children were overweight and 9.7% were obese. The prevalence of zinc deficiency was 42.6% and anemia was 28%, both were significantly higher in females as compared to males. When using both serum ferritin and Tsaturation levels as markers of iron deficiency 7(2%) children were found to have IDA. Combined iron and zinc deficiencies using ferritin as a marker of iron deficiency was found in 8(2.3%) of the children while when using Tsaturation as a marker of iron 42(12%) of the children had combined iron and zinc deficiencies. Conclusion. Zinc deficiency and anemia are common in preschool children of Vhembe district, Limpopo province. Iron and zinc deficiency in children is associated with poor growth development, alteration in neurological function, immunological response and behaviour changes.

Firew Lemma Berjia

National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, The Netherlands

Title: Finding the optimum scenario in risk-benefit assessment: An example on Vitamin D

Time : 16:45-17:10

Speaker
Biography:

Firew Lemma Berjia has completed his PhD at the age of 27 years from the National Food Institute, Technical University of Denmark. He has published 4 papers in reputed journals including his MSc thesis and he is now looking for a new a new scientific challenge. This abstract is also published in reputed scientific journals.

Abstract:

In risk-benefit assessment of food and nutrients, several studies so far have focused on comparison of two scenarios to weigh the health effect against each other. One obvious next step is finding the optimum scenario that provides maximum net health gains. Aim: This paper aims to show a method for finding the optimum scenario that provides maximum net health gains. A multiple scenario simulation. The method is presented using vitamin D intake in Denmark as an example. In addition to the reference scenario, several alternative scenarios are simulated to detect the scenario that provides maximum net health gains. As a common health metric, Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALY) has been used to project the net health effect by using the QALIBRA (Quality of Life for Benefit Risk Assessment) software. The method used in the vitamin D example shows that it is feasible to find an optimum scenario that provides maximum net health gain in health risk-benefit assessment of dietary exposure as expressed by serum vitamin D level. With regard to the vitamin D assessment, a considerable health gain is observed due to the reduction of risk of other cause mortality, fall and hip fractures when changing from the reference to the optimum scenario. The method allowed us to find the optimum serum level in the vitamin D example. Additional case studies are needed to further validate the applicability of the approach to other nutrients or foods, especially with regards to the uncertainty that is usually attending the data.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Stoner completed his PhD at the University of Michigan in 1970, conducted post-doctoral studies at the University of California-San Diego and, in 1992, joined the Department of Preventive Medicine at Ohio State University as Lucius Wing Chair in Cancer Etiology and Prevention. He has Chaired the NIH Chemo/Dietary Prevention and the ACS Nutrition and Environment Study Sections. He is Professor of Medicine at the Medical College of Wisconsin and is conducting additional clinical trials of berries for the prevention of esophagus and colon cancer. He has more than 300 peer-reviewed publications. 55 book chapters and has edited 4 books.

Abstract:

We examined the ability of freeze-dried berries to prevent G.I. tract cancers in animals and humans. Most studies used black raspberries (BRBs), due to their high antioxidant potential and high content of anthocyanins and fiber. In rodent studies, the consumption of BRB powder, at 2.5, 5 and 10% of a synthetic diet, resulted in a 40-70% inhibition of carcinogen-induced cancer in the rat esophagus and colon, and the spontaneous development of intestinal tumors in mice. Mechanistically, BRBs inhibit proliferation, inflammation and angiogenesis and stimulate apoptosis and differentiation, and protectively modulate genes in multiple signaling pathways. The most active inhibitory constituents in BRBs are the anthocyanins. A Phase I trial showed that BRBs are well tolerated in humans at oral doses that elicit chemopreventive effects in rodents. The oral administration of BRB powder (45g/day) to 20 Barrett’s esophagus patients for 6 months led to reductions in oxidative stress, but minimal effects on the lesion. Oral administration of strawberry powder (60g/day) to 37 Chinese patients with esophageal dysplasia led to histologic regression of ~80% of mildly dysplastic lesions and reduced levels of iNOS, COX-2, and phospho-NF-κB-p65 proteins. Treatment of 20 colorectal cancer patients with BRB powder for an average of 3 weeks led to reduced cell proliferation and demethylation of suppressor genes in the Wnt signaling pathway. Treatment of patients with familial adenomatous polyposis with rectal BRB suppositories caused a 36% regression of rectal polyps. These trials indicate that berries have significant promise for chemoprevention of esophageal and colon cancer in humans.

Speaker
Biography:

Shirin Anil is a doctor who has specialized in Epidemiology & Biostatistics. She has won Gold medals for best research study and has been awarded Endeavour Executive Fellowship in Nutrition Epidemiology by the Australian Government. She is conducting research in collaboration with researchers in Australia, Malaysia, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates. She has more than 40 papers and is in process of writing and editing an academic book on Nutrition and NCDs.

Abstract:

The DASH diet provides strong evidence for an optimal dietary pattern (DP) for blood pressure (BP) control; however investigation at the level of key foods in a DP is sparse. This study aimed to assess the relationship between DP driven by key foods with BP in a sample of obese Australian adults. Secondary analysis was conducted on baseline data of 118 participants recruited to a 12 month RCT that studied the effect of fish and long chain omega-3 fatty acids on weight reduction. Dietary assessment was by a validated diet history interview. The average of three office BP measurements was taken. Factor analysis extracted DPs and their relation to systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) was analysed using multiple linear regression. Eight DPs were identified: meat & alcohol, seafood, fats, fruits & nuts, legumes, confectionery, sweet foods, and yeast spread & salt. A decrease in SBP was associated with adherence to the fruit & nuts pattern (β = -4.1 (95% CI -7.5 to -0.7) mm Hg) and with seafood for DBP (β= -2.4 (-4.6 to -0.3) mm Hg). SBP and DBP increased with yeast spread & salt (β= 4.3 (1.4 – 7.3); 2.5 (0.9 – 4.0) mm Hg, respectively). In obese adults attending for weight loss, DPs that included larger amounts of fruits & nuts and/or seafood were associated with lower BP at baseline, while patterns that were characterised by yeast spread & salt were associated with higher BP.

Guillaume Fond

Paris-Est University School of Medicine, France

Title: The \
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Guillaume B. Fond is an Associate Professor of Psychiatry at University at Paris-Est, is serving as psychiatrist at Créteil Schizophrenia Expert Center (Pr Leboyer) and researcher at the Inserm U955, DHU Pe-Psy, Créteil, France. He coordinates the French Schizophrenia Expert Centers Network. He graduated from Montpellier University with the degree of MD, and PhD along with Paris-Est University, Créteil, France. Dr. Fond is a member of various societies including FondaMental Foundation. He has authored more than 50 peer reviewed journal articles, has the credit of more than 15 presentations and is serving as an editorial board member of the Nature Publishing group journal “Scientific Reports”.

Abstract:

The gut microbiota is increasingly considered as a symbiotic partner in the maintenance of good health. Metagenomic approaches could help to discover how the complex gut microbial ecosystem participates in the control of the host\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\'s brain development and function, and could be relevant for future therapeutic developments, such as probiotics, prebiotics and nutritional approaches for psychiatric disorders. The aim of the present lecture is to synthetize the current data on the association between microbiota dysbiosis and onset and/or maintenance of major psychiatric disorders, and to explore potential therapeutic opportunities targeting microbiota dysbiosis in psychiatric patients.

Speaker
Biography:

Associate Professer Burne completed his PhD at the University of New England and postdoctoral studies from The Babraham Institute, Cambridge, UK. He is currently a principal research fellow at the Queensland Brain Institute. He has published more than 90 papers, received continuous NHMRC Project grant support since 2007 as an independent researcher, and is an editorial board member of PLOS One.

Abstract:

Developmental Vitamin D (DVD) deficiency in rats is associated with alterations in brain development and behaviour, with features of relevance to schizophrenia. Although the DVD model does not replicate every aspect of schizophrenia, it has several prominant features; the exposure is based on clues from epidemiology, it reproduces the increase in size of the lateral ventricles and it reproduces well-regarded behavioural phenotypes associated with schizophrenia (e.g. hyperlocomotion). While hallucinations and delusions (positive symptoms) feature prominently in diagnostic criteria, impairments of cognitive symptoms, including attentional processing and behavioural inhibition are core features of schizophrenia. Our aim was to investigate aspects of response inhibition and impulsivity in control and DVD-deficient rats. DVD-deficient rats demonstrated mildly enhanced impulsivity and response inhibition as measured using the 5 choice continuous performance task and the differential reinforcement task. There were no significant effects of maternal diet on delay-dependent memory, or on choice of small or large rewards using delay discounting. However, DVD-deficient rats had a significant delay in response latency in performance on both tasks, which suggests they had altered levels of motivation to perform the task. This was confirmed with DVD-deficient rats having a reduced break point using a progressive ratio task. We have previously shown that the dopamine system is altered in DVD deficient rats and, given the role of dopamine in motivation and reward, this may underly the deficits seen within the model. The DVD-deficient rat model is characterised by a phenotype reminiscent of both positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia, and these results suggest that DVD-deficient rats also have specific impairments in motivation.

Renata Gobato

Universidade Estadual de Campinas-UNICAMP, Brazil

Title: Micronutrient and physiologic parameters before and 6 months after RYGB

Time : 16:20-16:45

Speaker
Biography:

Renata Cristina Gobato is a registered dietitian who has achieved her master degree at the age of 27 years from Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP). She also has postgraduate degree in Sports Nutrition from Universidade de São Paulo (USP), and postgraduate degree in Nutrition in Digestive System from UNICAMP. Nowadays she is developing her doctorate study at UNICAMP and attending postgraduation in Functional Nutrition. She also acts as a teacher and nutrition course coordinator at a private university in Brazil.

Abstract:

Bariatric surgery is considered an effective method for sustained weight loss, but may cause various nutritional complications. The aim of this study was to evaluate the nutritional status of minerals and vitamins, food consumption, and to monitor physiologic parameters in patients with obesity before and 6 months after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB). Thirty-six patients who had undergone RYGB were prospectively evaluated before and 6 months after surgery. At each phase their weight, height, body mass index (BMI), Electro Sensor Complex (ES Complex) data, food consumption, and total protein serum levels, albumin, pre- albumin, parathyroid hormone, zinc, B12 vitamin, iron, ferritin, copper, ionic calcium, magnesium, and folic acid were assessed. The mean weight loss from baseline to 6 months after surgery was 35.34±4.82%. Markers of autonomic nervous system balance, stiffness index, standard deviation of normal-to-normal R-R intervals (SDNN), and insulin resistance were also improved. With regard to the micronutrients measured, 34 patients demonstrated some kind of deficiency. There was a high percentage of zinc deficiency in both pre- (55.55%) and postoperative (61.11%) patients, and 33.33% of the patients were deficient in prealbumin post-operatively. The protein intake after 6 months of surgery was below the recommended intake (<70 g/d) for 88.88% of the patients. Conclusion: Despite improvements in the autonomic nervous system balance, stiffness index markers and insulin resistance, we found a high prevalence of hypozincemia at 6 months post- RYGB. Furthermore, supplements protein were needed to maintain an adequate protein intake up to 6 months postsurgery.